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View Full Version : Vines, Blossoms & NO BEANS!


budderfly
August 13th, 2008, 09:51 AM
I have beautiful green bean vines, lots of blossoms and NO BEANS! Bees are present, I have Lima beans growing, corn, cucs and tomatoes as well as pumpkins and squash galore.
Any thoughts? I am so sad and have been looking forward to putting some beans up - they are are a family favorite so I planted a bunch!
:eek:

LarryS
August 14th, 2008, 07:31 AM
I have beautiful green bean vines, lots of blossoms and NO BEANS! Bees are present, I have Lima beans growing, corn, cucs and tomatoes as well as pumpkins and squash galore.
Any thoughts? I am so sad and have been looking forward to putting some beans up - they are are a family favorite so I planted a bunch!
:eek:

Same here in Texas. No idea why except our bees are dead this year. Someone suggested we planted on the wrong sign of the moon. I dont really believe in moonism, but will -in respect-plant accordingly next year:)

Ted
August 14th, 2008, 08:35 AM
Same here in Texas. No idea why except our bees are dead this year. Someone suggested we planted on the wrong sign of the moon. I dont really believe in moonism, but will -in respect-plant accordingly next year:)

Did you apply any type of nitrogen to the beans. As you probably know, Beans don't need nitrogen. If You don't have Bee's, go buy a small hummingbird Feeder and Mix a solution of (1) cup of sugar per quart of water then add enough red colored, sugared, Cool-aid to the solution to make it bright red. boil the mixture for about 5 minutes, then add two tablespoons of Honey mix thouroughly and and put the hummingbird feeder about 6' to 8' High in the middle of the garden.

Train
August 14th, 2008, 08:42 AM
Ya!
While there are some real experts with regard
to beans I would ask how long your beans have
been in and if it could be said this way, how many
cyles of blossoms failed.
What I am getting at is that if this batch looks
like it's never going to produce there is still plent
of time for another planting as beans grow fast.
It almost sounds like you may indeed have
as Ted suggested blasted them with nitro.
luck to you.
Train

FiberFlinger
August 14th, 2008, 09:21 AM
Same here in SoE. Missouri with my Potatoe beans from BC. Plants are lush, mega flowers. One bean pod. They are beginning to bloom again right now, but It crossed my mind to rip them out, if they had not been so expensive I would have. I at least wanted to make back the few seeds I reveived to begin with and try again next year.

Emerald
August 14th, 2008, 09:48 AM
Did you apply any type of nitrogen to the beans. As you probably know, Beans don't need nitrogen. If You don't have Bee's, go buy a small hummingbird Feeder and Mix a solution of (1) cup of sugar per quart of water then add enough red colored, sugared, Cool-aid to the solution to make it bright red. boil the mixture for about 5 minutes, then add two tablespoons of Honey mix thouroughly and and put the hummingbird feeder about 6' to 8' High in the middle of the garden.

I hate to be the one to say this but --- NO honey in hummingbird mix!!! :eek: Honey can contain a form of botulism that is fatal to hummers!! I would never use any red dye or cool-aid either-- too many chemicals that are not needed to attract hummers... most feeders are red and yellow and will attract them and dying the food red is not really needed.
Side note-- the botulism is safe for people to eat-- as we have immunity to it-- but infants and children under the age of 2 are not-- that is why they recommend that people not give it to children under the age of 2.
Ted-- sorry if I came off as loud and mean-- not my intention.:o-- I just don't want anyone to find the poor dead hummers and not know why.

budderfly
August 14th, 2008, 11:25 PM
Now that I think of it, I may well have given them some fish emulsion early early on. They are planted near my corn which I have been feeding and it is quite possible that they got some - ugh.
Wow, what a crummy lesson to learn the hard way - my vines are nearly 10 feet tall!:(
Thank you for all your help - they are the most beautiful vines I've ever seen!
Interestingly enough, my Lima's that are in the same patch but on the opposite side of the corn are doing really well.
Our ave 1st frost here is the end of September, I doubt I could get anything growing here in time to harvest but I guess I know what I will be planting in my greenhouse this fall.

is there anything worth trying to encourage production this late in the game or should I rip all of them out? Is there a chance some of them may produce?:confused:
Thank you!

countrytomato401K
August 15th, 2008, 02:30 AM
is there anything worth trying to encourage production this late in the game or should I rip all of them out? Is there a chance some of them may produce?:confused:
Thank you!

PLEASE DO NOT RIP THEM OUT!!!!!!

Apply a spray fertilizer of 10-20-10 to the leaves, then hoe up some dirt
around thebase of the plant. 99% of the time that beans don't produce it
has something to do with the roots (not getting enough nutrients). So
spraying will give it a boost at the start.

You can also apply a granular fert of 10-20-10 at the base then hoe
it up if you don't have the spray.

Happy Gardening! :)

budderfly
August 15th, 2008, 10:23 AM
oh thankyou! I was so sad all night thinking I would have to rip them out - I will get spraying and see if I can undo any of the damage - if too much Nitro is the culprit will applying more (10-20-10) hurt?

budderfly
August 15th, 2008, 10:26 AM
I will also try a hummingbird feeder in the midst of the vines to lure the bees in from the corn and sunflowers!
Thanks for the suggestion

puttgirl
August 15th, 2008, 10:39 AM
Yes, sometimes beans are slow to come. If you are seeing flowers, though, you should be getting them soon. Mine seemed to take forever this year, too, but once I got a few beans, they really started producing pretty well a week later. And with all due respect to Ted, you shouldn't add Kool-aid, coloring or honey to hummingbird feeders. One quarter cup sugar to one cup of water brought to a simmer is good enough. Artificial coloring can be harmful.

FiberFlinger
August 16th, 2008, 07:38 AM
I hate to be the one to say this but --- NO honey in hummingbird mix!!! :eek: Honey can contain a form of botulism that is fatal to hummers!!

This is an old wives tale from who knows where. Honey DOES contain peroxide which botulism cannot grow in. It is used as an antibiotic ointment to heal cuts and does work for that due to the amount of peroxide in it and the sterilness of it. It CAN make a human infant very ill due to the immaturity of the child's intestinal track and not having the proper amount of flora in it. It has been called Botulism but is not as true botulism is a Soil Born organism which is something that NEVER reaches honey unless dropped on the floor. Anything called a "Form" of botulism is inaccurate.

darwinslair
August 16th, 2008, 08:19 AM
As far as not getting beans but having excessive growth:

Heat.

Many kinds of beans can only set the pods really between 60-80 degrees. Wait until it cools down a bit if it has been excessively hot.

My runners just started setting a lot of pods in the last few weeks after more than a month of flowering wonderfully without setting anything (the hummingbirds love them btw). My kentucky pole beans are doing the same. The purple podded pole, yellow wax pole, and golden of bacau all set fine in the heat and are continuing in the cooler temps we have had lately.

Beans do not need external pollination, so bees or no bees should not mean anything. They self-pollinate before they even open.

Good luck
Tom Kleffman

Emerald
August 16th, 2008, 08:53 AM
This is an old wives tale from who knows where. Honey DOES contain peroxide which botulism cannot grow in. It is used as an antibiotic ointment to heal cuts and does work for that due to the amount of peroxide in it and the sterilness of it. It CAN make a human infant very ill due to the immaturity of the child's intestinal track and not having the proper amount of flora in it. It has been called Botulism but is not as true botulism is a Soil Born organism which is something that NEVER reaches honey unless dropped on the floor. Anything called a "Form" of botulism is inaccurate.

I wonder how so many folks could be so wrong about honey/botulism?

http://www.honey.com/downloads/infantbotulism.pdf
http://www.drgreene.com/21_1476.html
http://www.crousefarms.net/honey-and-health.html
http://www.manukahoneyusa.com/honey-tips-and-recipes.htm

http://animals.about.com/od/hummingbirds/ig/A-Visual-Guide-to-Hummingbirds/Topic-4.htm
http://www.sabo.org/hbfaqs.htm
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/hummingbird/2003034557008251.html

Not to mention that honey water ferments very well, and can cause many other problems not just Botulism.
I guess WE all just passed that old wives tale about.

winter_unfazed
August 16th, 2008, 09:44 AM
Your beans may be deficient in potash and/or boron. This is often the cause of dropped flowers with no beans.

Furthermore, most types of beans (except runner) are self-pollinated, so bees are rather irrelevant in this case.

budderfly
August 16th, 2008, 10:53 AM
As far as not getting beans but having excessive growth:

Heat.

Many kinds of beans can only set the pods really between 60-80 degrees. Wait until it cools down a bit if it has been excessively hot.

My runners just started setting a lot of pods in the last few weeks after more than a month of flowering wonderfully without setting anything (the hummingbirds love them btw). My kentucky pole beans are doing the same. The purple podded pole, yellow wax pole, and golden of bacau all set fine in the heat and are continuing in the cooler temps we have had lately.

Beans do not need external pollination, so bees or no bees should not mean anything. They self-pollinate before they even open.

Good luck
Tom Kleffman

We have had extremely high temps this summer, it is cooling down now so I will wait and see.
Some of my vines appear to be done flowering though - maybe they will flower again.
I didn't realize they self-pollinate- that makes me think it is the heat as I have had lots of blooms.
Next year I will choose a variety that does better in our summer heat.
Thank you for all your help.

Ted
August 18th, 2008, 12:44 PM
I hate to be the one to say this but --- NO honey in hummingbird mix!!! :eek: Honey can contain a form of botulism that is fatal to hummers!! I would never use any red dye or cool-aid either-- too many chemicals that are not needed to attract hummers... most feeders are red and yellow and will attract them and dying the food red is not really needed.
Side note-- the botulism is safe for people to eat-- as we have immunity to it-- but infants and children under the age of 2 are not-- that is why they recommend that people not give it to children under the age of 2.
Ted-- sorry if I came off as loud and mean-- not my intention.:o-- I just don't want anyone to find the poor dead hummers and not know why.
Every time a person post something on this forum that has been tested, tried and works there is always an expert who knows it dosent work. I have been using the Sugar, Colored Kool Aid and the Honey for years it works great. I attracts Humming birds, and Bees, as a mater of fact they compete for the mixture, We currently have about 5 feeders and we have about 10 to 12 different Humming birds that have been here since the last of march as well as a thriving Bee presence to pollenate the garden. If You try it, it works if you don't fine.

budderfly
August 18th, 2008, 01:39 PM
I got 5 beans this morning!

Hooray Hooray Hooray!:p

I think I must have accidentally put some fish emulsion on my first batch as they have not produced, but my second planting is finally getting going!

Thank you for all your suggestions - I will definitely make some changes for next season.

Have any of you ever grown pole beans in a greenhouse? I would love suggestions on varieties that do well.

Bill W.
August 24th, 2008, 02:09 AM
This is an old wives tale from who knows where. Honey DOES contain peroxide which botulism cannot grow in. It is used as an antibiotic ointment to heal cuts and does work for that due to the amount of peroxide in it and the sterilness of it. It CAN make a human infant very ill due to the immaturity of the child's intestinal track and not having the proper amount of flora in it. It has been called Botulism but is not as true botulism is a Soil Born organism which is something that NEVER reaches honey unless dropped on the floor. Anything called a "Form" of botulism is inaccurate.

Honey most certainly can, and frequently does, contain Clostridium botulinum spores. I have personally observed the spores under the microscope. However, honey does not generally contain botulin toxin, which is the typical cause of botulism. Infants are at risk from eating honey because their gastrointestinal system is not sufficiently aerobic to prevent growth of C. botulinum from the spores present in the honey. So, the bacteria grow and then produce the toxin within the infant. An adult does not have this problem, because C. botulinum cannot grow in the aerobic conditions of the adult GI system. An adult must generally consume botulin toxin that has already been produced by C. botulinum growing in an anaerobic environment, like a sealed jar.

I can't say what condition applies to hummingbirds, as I have no knowledge of their GI systems.

Honey does not really contain hydrogen peroxide, but will produce a very small amount of it when combined with water. If you smear honey on a wound, the honey will absorb water from your tissues, resulting in the production of a miniscule amount of H2O2. This probably has very little impact on the healing of the wound; improved healing is more likely due to the fact that honey seals the wound against further infection and contains a high enough concentration of sugars to prevent bacterial growth.

C. botulinum is a soil borne bacterium which is present everywhere plants grow. It is on your fruits and vegetables, on your hands after you work in the garden, on the handles of all your tools, and on the petals of flowers that bees harvest nectar from. The bacterium sticks to the bees along with pollen and other debris and is carried back to the hive where it ends up in the honey. In the hostile environment of the hive, the bacterium generates a very durable spore which can survive with a suspended metabolism until conditions improve. The bacteria itself is generally harmless - it is the toxin that is produced under oxygen-free growing conditions that is a danger. You could eat handfuls of soil containing the bacteria and never have a problem.

LuvsToPlant
August 24th, 2008, 07:08 AM
Every time a person post something on this forum that has been tested, tried and works there is always an expert who knows it dosent work. I have been using the Sugar, Colored Kool Aid and the Honey for years it works great. I attracts Humming birds, and Bees, as a mater of fact they compete for the mixture, We currently have about 5 feeders and we have about 10 to 12 different Humming birds that have been here since the last of march as well as a thriving Bee presence to pollenate the garden. If You try it, it works if you don't fine.

Ted please no honey....
Would you concider the Audubon Society an expert on birds?
Please read below the does and don't on feeding humming birds from the Audubon.
Thank you.
http://kern.audubon.org/hummer_feeding.htm

American_Gardener
August 24th, 2008, 08:27 AM
I got 5 beans this morning!

Hooray Hooray Hooray!:p

I think I must have accidentally put some fish emulsion on my first batch as they have not produced, but my second planting is finally getting going!

Thank you for all your suggestions - I will definitely make some changes for next season.

Have any of you ever grown pole beans in a greenhouse? I would love suggestions on varieties that do well.

Congrats Bud... I hope you're picking em off so as to promote the plants going back into blossoming mode. It's been a few days since ya posted.. you getting any more?

I know how it feels to be waiting.. i got one variety called lazy wife that is now over 14 ft tall and it's just now blossoming. I sure hope i get monster crops to go along with those monster plants. And i know mine didn't get any fertilizer at all this year.. so it's not nitrogen.

oh thankyou! I was so sad all night thinking I would have to rip them out - I will get spraying and see if I can undo any of the damage - if too much Nitro is the culprit will applying more (10-20-10) hurt?

Yeah.. if ya haven't already used it... as ya probably know the Phosphate(20) will help produce blossoms, so ya should be using it.

Dave

budderfly
August 25th, 2008, 02:41 PM
Thank you for asking!
I have been getting about a handful of beans a day. And picking them has helped produce more blossoms.
The weather is spiking to 100 again today so I am hopeful my vines will produce a lot more as the cooler days arrive.
I'm glad to hear yours are slow too, I can hardly believe how tall mine have grown. Let me know if you get a good crop from yours as next year I will probably try some other varieties (maybe an earlier heat tolerant crop and a later one as well)

Do you have a recommendation for the phosphate?

American_Gardener
August 25th, 2008, 03:45 PM
I'd hate ta be recomending something without really knowing what your soil needs. I was just commenting on that higher middle number there as being good for promoting the blossoming. I don't see vigourous plant growth from too much nitrogen as being all that bad. I certainly wouldn't pull anything. Worse that can happen now is you'll have larger plants than you normally would've had and a later harvest. Keep using what ya got and they'll definately keep flowering. And make sure you don't let any beans mature to the point of becoming seeds.. the plants will think their job is done and stop flowering altogether.

If ya do decide ya want to add more phosphate.. you might want to try some steamed bone meal.. it's usually 1-13-0 or 4-12-0 or something close to that. Then there's gypsum and Phosphate Rock which ya might want to try. Not sure of their ratios though. I think the Phosphate rock is something like over 30% total phosphate with alot of calcium. You oughta do a soil test before ya go adding any amendments though.. i know these can lower the acidity of the soil and they are slow release so they could even be affecting your crops next year.

With temps that hot it's no wonder you're not getting more beans. They don't really like it so hot. You'll do better once the weather cools down some.. then more of those blossoms will be setting pods.

It's not all my beans that are slow producing.. it's basically just one or two of the pole varieties out of a few hundred that have yet to blossom. But, that's normal for some pole varieties to be late. Mine are just a couple of late maturing varieties.

I think a good early pole type is McCaslan.. i've been getting bumper crops off of that one for weeks now. I'm bout ready to havest for the third time. I'm pretty sure it was less than 60 days till the first harvest on that one. It's producing like crazy anyways. You might like that one for next year.

Anyways.. just keep picking those handsfull of beans off till the weather breaks.. once it cools down you should do fine.

Dave

zeedman
August 26th, 2008, 10:53 PM
While the negative relationship of nitrogen to beans is well established, I'm not sure that nutrient levels are germane to the problem. Too much N would lead to excessive foliage, and delayed flowering. If there already are/were large numbers of blossoms, then nitrogen is not likely to be the culprit. IMO, adding any nutrients at this point (without a soil test) might only create an imbalance.

Budderfly, are your beans well mulched? If not, then adding a thick layer might be beneficial, to help maintain consistent soil moisture levels. In my garden, I have observed that water stress - in conjunction with heat stress - contributes to blossom drop. Some pole beans seem more sensitive to this than others. A good soaking, and perhaps a spray in the morning, might improve blossom set. And as others have stated, provided that you keep the plants healthy, lower temperatures should lead to more pods.

budderfly
August 27th, 2008, 10:09 AM
Thank you to both of you for all your wisdom.
After I really started to worry about my beans I did some more checking on my soil. I have wondered if mulching might help - even though I tilled loads and loads of compost and other amendments after we moved here last year I am finding that it is still pretty compacted and clay-like. I am already gathering materials to layer on my garden over the winter . . .
I have tweaked the watering to keep things from drying out and mulching is next on my list. So thank you Zeedman!
Amer. Gard - thank you also, I appreciate the recommendation on the bean variety for next year, I hadn't thought of a bone meal steam, sounds like I need to do a soil test.
Temps dropped dramatically this morning (as it always seems to here) down to the 50's so hopefully I will see more production soon. I have been counting on this crop all summer to do some storage and swapping with neighbors.

Thank you so much again, I think this is the most valuable site on the internet (online banking is a close second!):D

scook
August 25th, 2014, 06:51 PM
My beans did nothing either. Don't know why. It isn't the bees' fault: beans don't need bees (or birds) to bear fruit. Neither do peas, for that matter.

brownrexx
September 1st, 2014, 09:11 AM
Some beans, like Scarlet Runner, DO need insects for pollination and my lima beans are covered with bumble bees. Whether they need them or not I don't know but the bees sure like their flowers.

LuvsToPlant
September 1st, 2014, 09:51 AM
Some beans, like Scarlet Runner, DO need insects for pollination and my lima beans are covered with bumble bees. Whether they need them or not I don't know but the bees sure like their flowers.

From what I understand...Lima's flowers are full of nectar that attracts pollinators...although they have self pollinated before the flower even opens.