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lorna-organic
February 28th, 2009, 11:01 AM
Once in awhile I make beef jerky in a non-electric food dehydrator. I'm interested in making some quantity this year. What is the best way to store jerky long term? Do people cook with jerky? Please share what you know about jerky.

LostPinesGal
February 28th, 2009, 11:12 AM
I make lots of jerky at Christmas time for gifts for family. I use a homemade recipe and marinade that doesn't have any of the preservatives(nitrates) found in the store-bought jerky spice mixes.

I don't worry about it going bad, because it is consumed by the recipient within a week of it being made! If it needs to be stored for longer periods of time, I'd place it in a vacuum-sealed bag and freeze or refridgerate it for safety reasons. That should keep any "beasties" from growing in it.

lorna-organic
February 28th, 2009, 12:09 PM
http://beefjerkyhouse.com/blog/?p=33

Black Pepper Beef Jerky Beans

Ingredients:
2 cups dried pinto beans
water
1 package black pepper beef jerky, cut into strips
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons crushed garlic (or 2 garlic cloves, diced finely)
2 bay leaves
1 medium red onion, diced
1 lemon, juiced
1 lime, juiced

Instructions:
Bring 4 cups of water and beans to a boil in a small covered pot. Turn off the heat. Let the pot sit for 1 hour. Move the beans and water to a bowl and cover.

Put the beef jerky strips in same pan with 1/2 c water on medium-high.
Cook for 10 minutes to soften.

Drain the water from the beans in the bowl. Add olive oil, garlic, bay leaves, drained beans, 2 cups water, red onion, lemon and lime juice to the pot.
Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Simmer until desired consistency, stirring occasionally, approximately 2 hours. Remove bay leaves.

Prudenspurple
February 28th, 2009, 12:24 PM
Hey Lorna,
I'm no expert but I do make 10 -12 batches a year of venison, elk, and/or beef jerky. The kids (and now grandkids) and I are addicted to the stuff!
When you figure you average only 60% dry weight if it's really lean when you are done, it does tend to dissappear really, really quickly around here! I try to hide some back for later snacking and then I vacumn seal and put on dark shelf or in the freezer if I think it won't be found out by the youngsters in a few weeks. Otherwise just in good quality Ziplockquart or gallon bagies.
I love it as it is, so have never really tried rehydrating or cooking with it except when out camping. Otherwise seems like a waste of good jerky! :p

TimothyT

lorna-organic
February 28th, 2009, 12:34 PM
You've got me chuckling, Tim. I like snacking on jerky, too. Ii've never kept any around long enough to know how well it keeps. I don't have a lot of freezer space, LostPinesGal. I'm thinking in terms of shelf storage, but I wouldn't want any rude surprises. Such as finding mold on the meat, because it sweated in storage. (Those store bought bags of jerky always have a silica pack in the bag to absorb moisture.) I have heard that old-fashioned smoked hams often develop mold in storage, which people just cut off before cooking the meat.

I'm thinking in terms of putting food by for the impending "crisis" so many folks are fixated on. I don't like canned meat very much, so I thought jerky might be a good thing to stash. I never thought about cooking with jerky, the idea just popped into my head this morning.

springfever
February 28th, 2009, 02:19 PM
I've only made elk jerky and beef jerky but I too the easy way and marinated the thin strips in liquid smoke, worchestershire sauce and a little garlic powder and red pepper flakes. Yum. been a long, long time. might have to try again.

TennOC
February 28th, 2009, 02:29 PM
A smoked ham is smoked meat, not dried. Jerky that's dried enough will keep unrefrigerated. I would seal it up and also don't store where the temps vary a lot, like was said you don't want it to sweat and condense. Cool dark closet would be good.

capebuffalo
February 28th, 2009, 06:40 PM
lorna,

been making and eating jerky since i was a kid.

i would think the only long term storage method would be to vacuum pack your jerky with a dessicant inside. even at that i don't think it would necessarily be a good option to store for the big one. storage life is just not that long. imho

possibly store it in a barrel of salt . but i wouldn't think thats too practical.

do have a great tip on using it. how about a topping for pizza ! it adds a whole new twist for something different.

i use it in soups and gravys also. i eat it quite often as a main course. some i make as thick as 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick so its a bit more substantial.

capebuff

Longtail
February 28th, 2009, 07:58 PM
We smoke dry the jerky after brining and it lasts quite a long time. Freezing it works well also. My son and a lot of others make goose jerky, they are getting lots of geese right now, they jerk the breast meat.

Hairy Moose Knuckles
March 1st, 2009, 07:56 AM
Do we have any Jerky experts? You bet! I am a Bona Fida expert at eating it.:D

SpaceAge
March 1st, 2009, 03:12 PM
Well Sure !

Ever since I joined this Forum , I've been called a Jerk ! :eek:

OneoftheEarls
March 1st, 2009, 03:42 PM
wasna, pemmican, wojap, Ch'arki

http://agbiopubs.sdstate.edu/articles/ESS1-07.pdf

Jerky is best eaten fresh or refrigerated but you can dry it to preserve it...I have several recipes for venison jerky and is a staple snack here in the fall and summer.

The easy method is a dehyrdator...liquid smoke, worcheshire sauce and soy sauce...the best methods are attached at the link...this meat can be kept in the heat and in a pouch.

gardener5
March 1st, 2009, 03:47 PM
I'm no expert but have made both beef and deer jerky including twice this year. I believe it was Jackie Clay who said jerky can be canned but I will double check that, when I make deer jerky I use a recipe of hers if anyone is interested in it I could post it. Here lately I make mine in the oven with the door cracked.

hookangel
March 2nd, 2009, 12:09 AM
wasna, pemmican, wojap, Ch'arki

http://agbiopubs.sdstate.edu/articles/ESS1-07.pdf

Jerky is best eaten fresh or refrigerated but you can dry it to preserve it...I have several recipes for venison jerky and is a staple snack here in the fall and summer.


Gosh Earl.... thanks for the link. LOVE IT!!! I can use some of that to teach gd and nieces and nephews about their distant native american heritage.Very good lesson material..thx

Mook
March 2nd, 2009, 08:07 AM
Microwave Jerky

1/2 lb. Venison or Beef
1/4 Teaspoon Salt
1/3 Teaspoon Garlic Powder
1 Teaspoon Onion Powder
1/4 Teaspoon Black Pepper
1/4 Cup Worcestershire Sauce
1/4 Cup Soy Sauce
1/4 Cup Water
6 Drops Liquid Smoke

Slice meat 1/8 inch thick,which is better accomplished if meat is pretty well frozen.Combine the meat with the above ingredients and put in refrigerator over-night.
Put meat on (bacon rack) and set microwave on high for four minutes,then check.The meat will turn from brown to dark brown.If,after four minutes,the meat is not done,then cook for thirty second intervals until done.
The Jerky will dry some after it is removed from microwave.

Let cool...vacuum seal and freeze.

Jacquie
March 2nd, 2009, 09:05 AM
The key to making jerky to store is that you MUST remove ALL of the fat! The fat is what makes it go rancid and mold.
The other key is use a sealer that sucks all the air out!
THen a cool/dark place to store is fine. Freezer is always good as well.

hookangel
March 3rd, 2009, 12:16 PM
I have a freezer full of elk, antelope and venison... rarely any fat on it!

gardener5
March 3rd, 2009, 10:33 PM
I'm no expert but have made both beef and deer jerky including twice this year. I believe it was Jackie Clay who said jerky can be canned but I will double check that, when I make deer jerky I use a recipe of hers if anyone is interested in it I could post it. Here lately I make mine in the oven with the door cracked.

I double checked and in one of her articles Jackie Clay said to can it you just pack it in wide mouth pint or half pint jars without liquid and process the same as any meat.

Imp
March 6th, 2009, 05:40 AM
Not an expert, but have made jerky out of a couple deer one year or three, LOL.

As stated above, slice very lean meat thinly. I marinade it sometimes with a dab of liquid smoke, some garlic powder, onion powder, some good hot sauce- play with the marinade until you like it, add water as needed to cover meat , marinade in a zip lock in gallon or less batches, stir it arounmd a bit.

Bring meat slices out pat dry, and dry them to a crisp. I like mine quite thin and dry enough to snap.

I have made meat powders out of some of the jerky, added to soups to enrich them, as a base for gravies and casseroles.

Beef jerky- I've simmered this slow and long into soup with tomatoes and vegs.

Alabamy
May 2nd, 2010, 07:43 PM
bump

grapenut
May 5th, 2010, 02:26 AM
I got a brother who makes the best jerky I ever ate...and he wont share his recipe! he also makes a killer sturgeon jerky..my other brother and I are working on it though.

grapenut
May 5th, 2010, 02:27 AM
Do we have any Jerky experts? You bet! I am a Bona Fida expert at eating it.:D

Me too!:D

Alabamy
May 5th, 2010, 06:22 AM
Jerky is one of my favorite snacks so I am really looking forward to experimenting when my Excalibur arrives. The flavors I want to try are garlic, roasted jalapeņo, red pepper/honey/pineapple or orange. I also think green curry paste and coconut might make an interesting marinade or even some wasabi powder. I also want to try making pork jerky since pork loin always seems to be on sale.

Emerald
May 5th, 2010, 08:02 AM
Jerky is one of my favorite snacks so I am really looking forward to experimenting when my Excalibur arrives. The flavors I want to try are garlic, roasted jalapeņo, red pepper/honey/pineapple or orange. I also think green curry paste and coconut might make an interesting marinade or even some wasabi powder. I also want to try making pork jerky since pork loin always seems to be on sale.

I've made ham and pepperoni and turkey. All turned out good but pepperoni needs to be kept cold as there is quite a bit of fat in it and for some reason(it was cheap pepproni not the good cured type) it went a bit rancid on us.
Turkey does have to be cooked first or the long time it takes to dry will make it be a bit funky. I am only assuming that pork would be the same.
We took turkey and lightly roasted the slices after marinating them and the put them in the dehydrator.
We played with many flavors of venison and beef jerky and the kids really liked the hot/sweet combo.. go figure... and sugar made the jerky softer without making it subject to spoiling...
I usually dried my jerky till it was dry, dry, dry, and took a bit of chewing but it lasted better that way no mold or any storage problems, well if it lasted that long...
You will find out that most folks will think your jerky is too dry. Most store bought jerky has some kind of preservative in it that keeps it softer. (please note I said most, not all) most folks will like it but don't worry some will always carp about how dry it is...:rolleyes:

stone
May 5th, 2010, 05:21 PM
When I made road-kill venison jerky many years ago, I cooked it, then smoked it then dried it in a homemade solar dehydrater, I kept it at whatever temp it was where ever I was, and it didn't go bad... had some that was still edible a year later...

I tried cooking with it, but outside of making broth, it really wasn't something worth cooking with.

Alabamy
May 9th, 2010, 12:39 PM
Here is a recipe for Biltong which is a South African dried meat. It is thicker than jerky and also cured with vinegar.

http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Miscellany/Biltong_15192.html

lalbers
May 9th, 2010, 10:42 PM
Mix teriaki sauce, soy sauce, box of sweet pink wine, jar of honey, red pepper flakes, marinate for 24 hrs, dry on racks. yum.