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jec07
November 25th, 2005, 03:26 PM
I live in central Illinois. I have had problems in the past with losing heirloom tomato plants to early blight. Can anyone recommend some varieties which are disease resistant and good producers. Thanks

MatthewH
November 29th, 2005, 12:39 AM
I live in the Springfield, IL area. About 6 or 8 years ago I got some seeds from Shumways of Original Abe Lincoln tomatoes (rather appropriate for this area). I grew them succesfully for several years without problems. They were productive plants with medium sized and good tasting fruits. After I quit playing around with tomato varieties I will probably go back to those Abe Lincolns.

Happy Trails!
-- Matthew

don_maples
December 9th, 2005, 07:15 PM
I garden in Tuscaloosa Alabama where early and late blights are expected to some
degreee each year though they can be masked by gray leaf spot. This year my Cherokee Purples kept getting longer as lower leaves died and produced into Nov.
except for Dog Days.

Pharmerphil
December 9th, 2005, 07:40 PM
Oh this is the home of cool wet, cloudy days, and we raise heirlooms only, I have heard the lincolns that were mentioned are resistent, Good air circulation, cornmeal spray even when You just "think" you have a problem, and pray for warmth and SUNSHINE!

BlackbearryGardens
December 13th, 2005, 04:06 PM
I've had plenty of trouble with tomato diseases in my garden. At first I even lost the disease resistant ones. This year was my best crop yet and I only lost a few tomatoes - they were weakened by frost damage.

Most of the time the disease is present in the soil. I used some organic methods this year with GREAT success. I used 1 cup of manure tea, 1 oz. molasses, 1 cup garlic tea to a gallon of water and sprayed this all over my plants. Unfortunately, due to ignorance I put 1 tsp. dish soap in it :mad: . Next year I'll be using the baking soda. :o

You may be interested in this website for some advice on different sprays to boost your plants.

Homemade Fungicide (http://ipmofalaska.homestead.com/files/homemadefungicide.html)

SelfSufficientOne
December 13th, 2005, 09:47 PM
Great page. Thanks! I really needed to read that. Got no tomatoes last year and now I see what I can do for them.

Skywalker
December 14th, 2005, 10:53 PM
Thanks for the info page! My 94 yr.old mother-in-law recommends Horsetail, which she calls Muletail, for about everything. We use it as an insecticide. I will print off the other recipes and use them next summer, I am sure.

PaulF
December 22nd, 2005, 11:59 AM
Good airflow in and around plants will help more than anything; that advise coming from a confirmed tomato staker/cager. Be sure to disinfect cages stakes etc. every year. If the soil is a problem, I have heard that covering the soil with black plastic in the early spring will kill organisms with the heat generated by sun on the plastic. Having never tried it, don't know of its effectiveness. Good airflow seems to work best for me no matter the variety.

johno
January 6th, 2007, 08:28 PM
Oh this is the home of cool wet, cloudy days, and we raise heirlooms only, I have heard the lincolns that were mentioned are resistent, Good air circulation, cornmeal spray even when You just "think" you have a problem, and pray for warmth and SUNSHINE!

Cornmeal spray???

Anybody know about this?

Lavandula Girl
January 6th, 2007, 10:27 PM
Could be that pre-emergent corn gluten stuff we were talking about in another thread. Here's the link again.
http://www.gluten.iastate.edu/pdf/cornglut3.pdf

Lillian Osborne
January 8th, 2007, 01:29 PM
Oh this is the home of cool wet, cloudy days, and we raise heirlooms only, I have heard the lincolns that were mentioned are resistent, Good air circulation, cornmeal spray even when You just "think" you have a problem, and pray for warmth and SUNSHINE!

Cornmeal spray?

trudyjean
January 9th, 2007, 05:45 AM
Here ya go:
http://gardening.about.com/od/naturalorganiccontrol/qt/Cornmeal.htm
I haven't tried it, but sounds simple an effective. trudyjean

windsng225
January 9th, 2007, 06:22 AM
What I have always done was to remove the bottom leaves before planting. I have removed as much as half of the leaf stems from the bottom. As said before, air circulation is vital. Works for me.
joyce

strong eagle
January 9th, 2007, 08:41 AM
I make sure my tomatoe plants are mulched heavily, emmediately after planting, the best I've found was straw, about 6 inches thinck. It keeps the spores from reaching the lower leaves after a heavy rain, also , the straw seems to be "astringent" against the disease spoors. Does everyone know about putting a teaspoon of Epsom Salts in the hole when you plant the tomato? I was taught that by my anscestors, when I was a small fry[ and didn't think they "really" knew what they were doing.] Tomatoes, and Peppers use the Magnesium Sulfate to combat disease and produce stable flowers and fruit. My most disease resistant heirloom tomato[other than wild cherry tomatoes] is the "Garden Peach"[ at Baker Creek, it's the "Whapsicon Peach"] Terrific golden, with touch of pink on one side and "fuzzy" all over. It also volinteers easily, so I allways have extra plants to put where I take out early Spring crops. Strong

johno
January 9th, 2007, 10:24 AM
Here ya go:
http://gardening.about.com/od/naturalorganiccontrol/qt/Cornmeal.htm
I haven't tried it, but sounds simple an effective. trudyjean

Everybody needs to read this. Thanks for aswering my question! Definitely a great tip for 2007!

honu
January 14th, 2007, 09:47 PM
Jec07, I have had problems in the past with losing heirloom tomato plants to early blight. Can anyone recommend some varieties which are disease resistant and good producers. Thanks Although some tomato varieties seem to be more tolerant than others to foliar disease, none are truly resistant. There is excellent discussion of foliage disease and tolerant varieties in Carolyn Male's book, "100 Heirloom Tomatoes for the American Garden", a book I highly recommend for anyone with an interest in tomato growing.
I have tried many things, including cornmeal tea, cornmeal sprinkles, various recipes of compost tea, EM tea, chamomile tea, etc., and the only thing that really worked for me in my hot, humid, and rainy garden was Daconil for disease prevention. The key is to coat the foliage BEFORE they become infected, as Daconil provides a coating that prevents fungus penetration. Only a few sprays just before anticipated rainy periods made a huge difference in helping my plants survive fungal attack.
And while your garden and results will differ from mine, some recently grown varieties that showed excellent foliage disease tolerance in my garden, compared to others, included (and not all are heirlooms, but all tasted great): Ramapo F4 (exceptional), Sungold cherry (exceptional), Black Cherry, Matt's Wild Cherry,Snow White cherry, Soldacki, Red Brandywine, Japanese Black Triefele, Carbon, Druzba, Sophie's Choice, Arkansas Traveler, New Big Dwarf, Azoychka, Green Grape cherry.

olerist
January 15th, 2007, 01:08 PM
Jec07, The key is to coat the foliage BEFORE they become infected, as Daconil provides a coating that prevents fungus penetration. Only a few sprays just before anticipated rainy periods made a huge difference in helping my plants survive fungal attack.
....varieties that showed excellent foliage disease tolerance in my garden, compared to others, included (and not all are heirlooms, but all tasted great): Ramapo F4 (exceptional), Sungold cherry (exceptional), Black Cherry, Matt's Wild Cherry,Snow White cherry, Soldacki, Red Brandywine, Japanese Black Triefele, Carbon, Druzba, Sophie's Choice, Arkansas Traveler, New Big Dwarf, Azoychka, Green Grape cherry.

Are you saying they only showed resistance after spraying?

Playoutside
January 20th, 2007, 05:05 PM
what do you all spray your tomatoe cages with each new season, a bleach and water mix?

honu
January 21st, 2007, 10:23 PM
Olerist, Are you saying they only showed resistance after spraying?Good question. To clarify, there were some plants that I didn't spray w/ Daconil at all, but stayed healthy much longer than other unsprayed plants: Arkansas Traveler, Druzba, Carbon, and Matt’s Wild Cherry. Arkansas Traveler stayed healthy the longest.
I did start out diligently spraying Daconil on Sungold, Ramapo, Soldacki, Black Cherry, Snow White cherry, Soldacki, Red Brandywine, Japanese Black Triefele, Sophie's Choice, New Big Dwarf, Azoychka, and Green Grape cherry, and several others. However, I didn’t keep up, and the ones I just mentioned stayed healthier than others. Sungold and Ramapo stayed healthy and productive the longest during the period of no spraying (4-1/2 months). Yellow Pear, Rose Quartz Multiflora, Break O Day, Brandyboy hybrid and others quickly succumbed to foliage disease when left unsprayed.
Of course, there could be many other variables at play -- these are just observations in my garden, and not to imply that the same would hold true in other gardens.

Playoutside, for tomato stakes, pots, supports, wires, ties – I disinfect them by soaking 10 minutes in a 10% bleach solution.

BEEGES
January 23rd, 2007, 09:12 PM
have you all ever tried neem seed meal? i lost all my tomatoes a few years ago to early blight but now i anti fungle everything and so far so good

SusieF
February 6th, 2007, 06:08 PM
I tried epsom salts last year and it really did work. my tomato plants were dark green and beautiful. I plan to use the salts again this year. The directions are on the bag.

gardenaholic
February 6th, 2007, 06:59 PM
Just a question with using Neem. Does it affect the taste, ie is it absorbed into ther fruit.

johnsonjrbm
February 7th, 2007, 01:22 AM
I had read something the other day by Dr. Carolyn Male indicating that potato-leafvarieties were generally more tolerant of diseases than regular-leaf. Thinking back to last year, I recall fewer late blight problems with my pl's compared to my rl's. I think it had something to do with the relative thickness of the surface of the leaves.

When I locate the reference, I'll post it here.

strong eagle
February 12th, 2007, 08:06 AM
I've used Neem seed oil spray for about 5 yrs now, and haven't had any taste from it show up, but then I tend to spray very carefully with any pesticide/fungicide so as to not hurt any beneficial insects. I also don't spray on any fruits if I can help it. Strong

gardenaholic
February 27th, 2007, 06:35 PM
Thats interesting about the PL leave varieties. Can you give me some types that you have grown that have been successful as I might give that a try. Also are they heat tollerant. This year has been exceptionally hot so I think that I might have to start using different varieties than I have grown in the past to take into account the changing climate.