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Judi Reilly
November 18th, 2009, 10:28 PM
I read somewhere that store bought garlic is treated with a chemical that enhances the whiteness of it...wondering if anyone has read this,,and if its really true,,can't find anything when I googled it...anyone?
Thanks Judi

bhpigeon2
November 18th, 2009, 10:46 PM
You can't find anything about it since it isn't done with anything much stronger than water. The varieties normally grown commercially are those which are naturally white. In fact, probably 99% of all garlic varieties have white skin with some being whiter than others.

bhp2

Judi Reilly
November 19th, 2009, 09:11 AM
ok..thanks bhpigein2,,but they do use chemicals on them when growing..for insects, and to promote growth...

Longtail
November 19th, 2009, 11:19 AM
Mostly for weed control.

bhpigeon2
November 19th, 2009, 03:40 PM
ok..thanks bhpigein2,,but they do use chemicals on them when growing..for insects, and to promote growth...
For insect control, the opposite is true. That is, garlic is used FOR insect control in many instances. In California, fungicides of one type or another are generally needed to control white rot. Whatever fertilizer is used would be incorporated into the soil prior to planting, not onto the bulb itself.

bhp2

lorna-organic
November 19th, 2009, 04:01 PM
I wonder if you are actually thinking about the chemical which is sprayed on commercially sold garlic to prevent sprouting--to extend the shelf life? Garlic which is sold as organic in the grocery store is not sprayed to prevent sprouting.

Longtail
November 19th, 2009, 07:36 PM
neither is much of the Gilroy and Chinese garlic.

bhp2, white rot, or pink rot, maybe both? Maybe its actually the same???

bhpigeon2
November 19th, 2009, 08:34 PM
Nothing is sprayed on garlic bulbs to prevent sprouting. Nor can any other vegetables be sprayed to prevent growth. The chemical that is used must be applied either at planting time, as with potatoes, or while growing, as with alliums. Although somewhat effective with potatoes, it is only a temporary deterrent with alliums and not usually considered cost-effective. So far, only a few onion growers use it. We know of no garlic growers who use it.

White rot is a garlic disease, pink rot affects potatoes. The Chinese do not have white rot as so far it is fairly isolated to California and possibly Canada. Thus much of the garlic sold or processed in Gilroy, CA comes from Oregon and Washington.

bhp2

mjc
November 19th, 2009, 08:46 PM
Nothing is sprayed on garlic bulbs to prevent sprouting. Nor can any other vegetables be sprayed to prevent growth. The chemical that is used must be applied either at planting time, as with potatoes, or while growing, as with alliums. Although somewhat effective with potatoes, it is only a temporary deterrent with alliums and not usually considered cost-effective. So far, only a few onion growers use it. We know of no garlic growers who use it.


Although irradiating it can be done to stop growth, gamma treatment isn't going to leave anything behind...and it has to be at least labeled as such. And it may not even work as a growth inhibitor, if the garlic is irradiated after dormancy (unless it is a high enough dose to actually cook it...in which case it should be very obvious that it was irradiated...it will have that lovely blue-green glow to it :D)

SpaceAge
November 19th, 2009, 09:53 PM
I read somewhere that store bought garlic is treated with a chemical that enhances the whiteness of it...wondering if anyone has read this,,and if its really true,,can't find anything when I googled it...anyone?
Thanks Judi

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FWIW :

I've bought the cheap white garlic from China at the Dollar store and Grocery stores as well as the more expensive grocery store stuff and they all sprout fine ... I usually break up the cloves and fill a bucket with water and soak them for a couple of days first.

bhpigeon2
November 20th, 2009, 01:29 AM
The common growth inhibitor is Royal MH-30, maleic hydrazide, and it's not effective on garlic. It's most common use is preventing suckers on tobacco. Some specialty potato growers also use it to prevent volunteers in their fields. A third use is onions as both foliar and storage but very limited. Those are the only 3 crops for which it is registered for use in the US.

bhp2

lorna-organic
November 20th, 2009, 07:04 AM
The common growth inhibitor is Royal MH-30, maleic hydrazide, and it's not effective on garlic. It's most common use is preventing suckers on tobacco. Some specialty potato growers also use it to prevent volunteers in their fields. A third use is onions as both foliar and storage but very limited. Those are the only 3 crops for which it is registered for use in the US.

bhp2

I have done multiple searches and can find nothing to support your claim. The following article claims that most of the garlic in US stores is imported from China, and that growth inhibitors are used. The article also has information about bleaching garlic to whiten it.

http://www.naturalnews.com/022801_garlic_Australia_food.html

"(NaturalNews) Garlic is recognised as a valuable ingredient in maintaining a healthy life and combating disease. However what looks to be perfectly natural could in fact be treated with chemicals. So the question is where is your garlic from and how has it been treated?

The bulk of the world's garlic is produced in China where the cost of labour significantly reduces the cost of manual processing that garlic requires. For this reason, in those countries that accept imported garlic (including USA, Australia but not Europe), buying imported garlic is cheaper.

Despite this, Chinese garlic does not meet with food safety protocols (at least those in Australia). According to Henry Bell of the Australian Garlic Industry Association, garlic from China is doused in chemicals to stop sprouting, to whiten garlic, and to kill insects and plant matter. He also reports that garlic is grown in untreated sewage (http://www.theage.com.au/news/epicu...) .

Garlic can be whitened by using chlorine or with a mixture of sulphur and wood ash. Whitening garlic helps to make it look healthier and more attractive to consumers. In fact this obsession with white foods has lead to the bleaching of many food products (flour, salt, sugar) using chlorine dioxide or benzoyl peroxide.

Growth inhibitors are used to stop garlic from sprouting and can be made from hormones or chemicals. When garlic begins to sprout, the garlic clove loses much of its potency. Growth inhibitors together with gamma irradiation extend the shelf life of garlic.

Gamma radiation is also used to sterilise many products, and in Australia, this treatment is not accepted for foodstuffs. This does not prevent food treated by gamma radiation to enter the country..."

lorna-organic
November 20th, 2009, 07:15 AM
From UC Davis:

http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/Produce/Producefacts/Veg/garlic.shtml

"...to control sprout development and lengthen the storage period, garlic may be treated with preharvest applications of sprout inhibitors (i.e., maleic hydrazide) or be irradiated after harvest...."

lorna-organic
November 20th, 2009, 07:17 AM
http://www.actahort.org/books/518/518_6.htm

"IDENTIFICATION OF THE METHOD USED TO INHIBIT SPROUTING IN GARLIC
Authors: C.N. Pellegrini, G.A. Orioli, C.A. Croci
Keywords: Allium sativum, garlic, ionizing radiation, maleic hydrazide, sprouting
Abstract:
The evolution of some indexes together with morphological characteristics of red garlic sprouts were evaluated, during post-harvest storage, as indicators of the sprouting inhibition method (application of Maleic Hydrazide or commercial doses of gamma rays). Those indexes were calculated on the base of macroscopic morphological parameters. From the end of dormancy onwards both showed, clearly, differences between treated and control bulbs. The effects produced by gamma irradiation, but not by MH, were observed in the colour and swelling of sprouts as well as the absence of mitosis and abnormalities in the nuclear morphology of meristematic cells from irradiated bulbs. These results are in agreement with the primary effects expected by each of the treatments. The parameters and characteristics evaluated could be used, from the end of dormancy onwards, to identify the inhibition method applied."

mjc
November 20th, 2009, 10:58 AM
The cheapest way would be irradiation...

bhpigeon2
November 20th, 2009, 10:35 PM
"Could be used" and "may be used" isn't the same as "is used". Learn more about MH-30 at:
www.pesticideinfo.org/Detail_Chemical.jsp?Rec_Id=PC35106

It's been tried on a lot of things, garlic included, since its development but is only effective and registered for use on potatoes, tobacco, and onions. No garlic grower in either the US or China is known to use it because of its cost and ineffectiveness. And as many hundreds of gardeners will attest, generic store-bought garlic sprouts and grows just as well as the same varieties purchased from Filaree, Irish Eyes, WeGrowGarlic, etc.

bhp2

Judi Reilly
November 21st, 2009, 08:50 PM
Thanks for the responses...however,,,I do have a distain for buying foods from China if I can at all stay away from it...thats why I do much more canning..buying my seeds from reputable sellers..like BC..we grow garlic,,etc..I do believe that it was the bleaching process that I had read about...it supposidly lowers the lasting of the garlic...just is for looks alone..I have grown garlic with as many as 26 cloves in it...and I am very satisfied with that..then again I have grown some with as few as 8 cloves...so I stick with We Grow Garlic..have not been disappointed w/thier service or product..
Happy Garlic Growing....Judi :)

tashak
November 21st, 2009, 09:00 PM
I too have been happy both with wegrowgarlic (ah, so many varieties and tastes!) and with the white Gilroy Christopher Ranch garlic which is in some supermarkets and definitely grows well.

bhpigeon2
November 22nd, 2009, 01:44 PM
Bleach would have no affect on sprouting and not needed for whitening. In fact, bleach is one of the chemicals suggested as a disinfectant when harvesting and planting. (Commercial growers must wash their bulbs to remove any traces of soil.) A soak in pure isopropyl alcohol or diluted bleach prior to planting is becoming the standard procedure among the commercial garlic community. That came about due to the unscrupulous practice of one big grower who distributed a lot of diseased stock a few years ago.

bhp2

Karl M
November 22nd, 2009, 08:15 PM
I have heard that it is a good idea to soak for a few hours in water with baking soda and them soaking for a short time in alcohol just before planting to kill fungi and other disease causing things. I haven't done it yet myself because I am new to growing garlic but probably will next year. In October I planted some Red Toch that I got at a farmers market and am excited about seeing the results next spring.