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mudhill
February 22nd, 2010, 07:39 PM
Could you good folks tell me the difference between ,walkng/bunching/multiplier onions.
i am looking for a onion that will spred on its own.
when i was a kid i had nieghbors that had onions like that ,but i did not know what they were called.
of course i might have been looking at some thing else through a kids perspective and ignorance.
thanks in advance

mjc
February 22nd, 2010, 08:19 PM
Most 'bunching' onions are Allium fistosulum...they are also know as scallions.

Multiplier onions are divided into two groups, those that produce bubils instead of flowers/seeds and the seed producers. The bubil producers typically have the 'flower' stalks fall over, from the weight of the bubils, which will root where they touch the ground...thereby 'walking' away from the original clump.

All three will also spread from the bulbs left in the ground.

lovetheland
February 22nd, 2010, 08:49 PM
I love my onions that spread on their own. They came from the old Homestead in Iowa. I planted some at our previous home but we moved a few years ago and my plot isn't very large yet due mainly to the poor soil where I planted the few I took with me. As mjc said, the stalks fall over and the bulbs reproduce there. The nice thing about those onions is that we always had very early onions in the spring with very little work once they are established.

Karl M
February 22nd, 2010, 10:51 PM
Two of the more common are White Lisbon and Evergreen White Bunching Onion. They are non-bulbing though White Lisbon can form a slight swelling. White Lisbon divides at the base. Each one that you plant will divide and produce 4-8 onions or so. Just eat the ones you want and plant the others. Evergreen White Bunching Onions are easy as well. Just leave a few unharvested and they will self sow each year and you will always have green onions. One of the things that is nice about them is that they are very cold hardy. Give them a patch of their own and you can keep them going for a long time without a whole lot of work.

lovetogarden
February 22nd, 2010, 11:02 PM
http://www.southernexposure.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=PONION

Here is a list and pictures of different multipliers for sale at southern exposure

kellygirrl
February 23rd, 2010, 12:05 AM
There has been lots of good threads on this.

I love walking onions, the ones that bend and multiply mostly from the top bulbils. They are so hardy and prolific over time. Great green onion eating early and late in the season. Tricks for cultivating them for root production were given here, I gotta find it. (Wish there was an easier way to search on IDig.)

This is my first year growing multipliers (from Southern Exposure, I think); they multiply underground by root. They make long storage onions. I was also interested in their perennial qualities. But Bhp2 says basically it's silly to winter them over in my zone, that I should treat them as annuals and replant in spring. But they ship in fall, so I planted and covered with a few layers of remay; we'll see.

mudhill
February 23rd, 2010, 02:02 AM
thanks folks for your answes,they have been a great help to me and has set me on to another project this spring.
i normaly google,but wanted to here from average garden folks.
i have used the search on here for different things but it has a lot to be desired.

as far as being to cold to over winter,i grew up 20 minutes west of chicago,,(aurora Ill. ) and we had some pretty mean winters in them days,,i am 64 yrs. old.
i know alot of folks had them onions in there gardens year around.
thanks again Larry

kellygirrl
February 23rd, 2010, 03:08 AM
as far as being to cold to over winter,i grew up 20 minutes west of chicago,,(aurora Ill. ) and we had some pretty mean winters in them days,,i am 64 yrs. old.
i know alot of folks had them onions in there gardens year around.
thanks again Larry

I assume you're talking about the multipliers, not the walking onions. Good to know. Bhp2 thot it would diminish productivity, as I recall, but I hope it to be a more or less permanent bed --maybe move it from time to time to avoid disease? Sigh, it's all an experiment, the whole dang yard.

lovetheland
February 23rd, 2010, 10:29 AM
mudhill,

You might send me a message late summer when I think my onions will drop their bulbs, bubils, whatever they are called. (I'm still learning!) I'm sure I could spare about 1/2 dozen. I know you will love these but it will take a couple of years to get a nice patch started. Once they are up and running if you plant them in decent soil you should have basically maintenance free onions in early spring. Unless of course, you come to NW MO you can stop by.

lovetheland

mudhill
February 23rd, 2010, 02:00 PM
mudhill,

You might send me a message late summer when I think my onions will drop their bulbs, bubils, whatever they are called. (I'm still learning!) I'm sure I could spare about 1/2 dozen. I know you will love these but it will take a couple of years to get a nice patch started. Once they are up and running if you plant them in decent soil you should have basically maintenance free onions in early spring. Unless of course, you come to NW MO you can stop by.

lovetheland

lovetheland
i will take you up on that offer,,i just hope i remember to get a hold of you then.
i get so many things going,,that i some times forget what day it is.
i thought when i was retired,that i would have more then enough time for every thing i wanted to do,,,,i am starting to wonder about that now.

lovetheland
February 23rd, 2010, 02:14 PM
mudhill,

I'll put you on my calendar and see if I remember to check my calendar! :cool: This is my first year of retirement too but since I'm now selling produce, eggs, and flowers and nursing my elderly mom guess I'm just starting two new careers! :D Used to have time to read lots of books but since retirement that hasn't happened. Ha! Maybe I better go back to my old job!!!

lovetheland

mudhill
February 23rd, 2010, 02:30 PM
mudhill,

I'll put you on my calendar and see if I remember to check my calendar! :cool: This is my first year of retirement too but since I'm now selling produce, eggs, and flowers and nursing my elderly mom guess I'm just starting two new careers! :D Used to have time to read lots of books but since retirement that hasn't happened. Ha! Maybe I better go back to my old job!!!

lovetheland

I understand completly and i am sure that a lot of others agree.
you have a fuller plate theni have it seems.
good luck in your indevors.

Larry

jadek
March 2nd, 2010, 10:01 AM
I planted He Shi Ko bunching onions last year, and read this year that they are a perennial. Since I left the extras in the garden last fall, I am thinking maybe they will spread this year. Anyhow, they look and taste like what supermarkets call a green onion.

mjc
March 2nd, 2010, 10:07 AM
I planted He Shi Ko bunching onions last year, and read this year that they are a perennial. Since I left the extras in the garden last fall, I am thinking maybe they will spread this year. Anyhow, they look and taste like what supermarkets call a green onion.

Various members of that group are what are sold as green onions.

jadek
March 2nd, 2010, 10:13 AM
I so wish grocery stores had more info on their produce! That is part of what appeals to me about growing my own - we actually know what we are eating...