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John Yeoman
September 26th, 2010, 10:36 AM
How many folk have had tomato blight this year? UK gardeners have suffered it since the mid 19th century but the newsletter HortIdeas tells me US gardeners have just started to worry about tomato blight. (When I mentioned ‘blight’ in a US forum in 2000, folk thought I referred to botrytis.) Is blight as we know it in the UK - Phytophthora infestans - really that new in America?

If you have a blight problem, here’s a tip that works for me. If your greenhouse is full (the best environment for tomatoes), and you have to grow outdoors, put a clear plastic awning over the plants. And water them carefully at the base, keeping the foliage dry. It seems that blight can get a grip only on damp haulm.

A friend in Switzerland lays bare copper wire under her tomato plants. She swears that the plant takes up the copper and becomes blight resistant! (Whether that's truly 'organic' or not, I can't say. :rolleyes:)

Certainly, I grew a fine tomato crop one year, untouched by blight, when my neighbours’ plants were rotting. Simply under an awning and without copper wire.

Has anyone tried the awning method?

nedwina
September 29th, 2010, 11:28 AM
How many folk have had tomato blight this year? UK gardeners have suffered it since the mid 19th century but the newsletter HortIdeas tells me US gardeners have just started to worry about tomato blight. (When I mentioned ‘blight’ in a US forum in 2000, folk thought I referred to botrytis.) Is blight as we know it in the UK - Phytophthora infestans - really that new in America?

If you have a blight problem, here’s a tip that works for me. If your greenhouse is full (the best environment for tomatoes), and you have to grow outdoors, put a clear plastic awning over the plants. And water them carefully at the base, keeping the foliage dry. It seems that blight can get a grip only on damp haulm.

A friend in Switzerland lays bare copper wire under her tomato plants. She swears that the plant takes up the copper and becomes blight resistant! (Whether that's truly 'organic' or not, I can't say. :rolleyes:)

Certainly, I grew a fine tomato crop one year, untouched by blight, when my neighbours’ plants were rotting. Simply under an awning and without copper wire.

Has anyone tried the awning method?

There were some reports of Late Blight outbreaks this year, but not nearly as bad as last season. Which was really bad. And yes, it's the same strain: Phytophthora infestans.

I'm not familiar with the awning method, but spraying copper based fungicides for blight control is practised here.

http://www.ladybug.uconn.edu/documents/late_blight_of_tomato_and_potato_in_connecticut_20 10_06-17-10.pdf

mudhill
September 29th, 2010, 05:21 PM
YES i had the blight very early in the season on all my tomato plant,last year i did not have the problem.
every one around here had it also.

the guy that gave me most of my mater plants ,said he had it also,but his girl friend/wife bought some thing at walmart to spray on them and it got rid of the blight,,he did not know what it was,,he said he would look ,but never got back with me.

i am gonna find out what it was,since this was the worse tomato season that i ever had in my gardening life and it has been a long one.

Larry

John Yeoman
September 30th, 2010, 01:47 PM
his girl friend/wife bought some thing at walmart to spray on them and it got rid of the blight,,he did not know what it was,,he said he would look ,but never got back with me.

i am gonna find out what it was,since this was the worse tomato season that i ever had in my gardening life and it has been a long one.

Larry

Larry, it's probable that WalMart was selling some proprietary version of Bordeaux solution, based on copper sulphate. It can prevent a mild attack of blight but has to be sprayed before blight occurs. It can slow the spread of the disease throughout a garden, in my experience, but - in a long hot humid season - is only partially effective. It cannot help a plant that's already showing signs of blight. :mad:

Longtail
September 30th, 2010, 03:12 PM
I got it about the time the tomatoes were dwindling. Sprayed for 3-4 weeks but quit(dont like to spray to begin with) and bang, thar it came.

Tom C
September 30th, 2010, 03:14 PM
John north eastern USian's got a big hit in 2009 of late blight. Most of the NE also gets a pretty good frost which interferes with late blight (up to a point).

2009 was a year of the perfect storm as far as weather conditions go to enhance late blight. Washington staters .have similar conditions to you in UK. I'm sure we have some here who will comiserate with you

mudhill
September 30th, 2010, 06:02 PM
Larry, it's probable that WalMart was selling some proprietary version of Bordeaux solution, based on copper sulphate. It can prevent a mild attack of blight but has to be sprayed before blight occurs. It can slow the spread of the disease throughout a garden, in my experience, but - in a long hot humid season - is only partially effective. It cannot help a plant that's already showing signs of blight. :mad:

like i said,don't know what it was,,but he claims it stopped the problem.

i hate useing chemicals,but next year i'll have to do some thing .

i like my maters and i did'nt have any to freeze but 2 quarts this year.

Larry

JanR
October 1st, 2010, 10:47 PM
I had blight for the first time ever. :( It was also 2nd wettest spring summer on record. Does anyone know if you can compost the plants that have suffered from blight?

FailedSlacker
October 1st, 2010, 11:02 PM
I think blight hit all the prairie provs. All the toms in Wosley were lost and about 75% here in Regina.

I didn't compost mine. The standard recommendation seems to be to bag them in plastic and dump them.

Direct Sunlight
October 1st, 2010, 11:59 PM
I asked about driving a copper wire into the tomato plant earlier this year, and got no replies on the forum. Have had no blight so never had the occasion to try it myself. My mom heard that tip from a "master gardener" in her area.

libsead
October 2nd, 2010, 01:32 AM
I had it this year. This was the worst year for tomato's in my garden in 8 years. Blight sucks!!!!!!!:mad: My neighbors had it also. We live on 2 acres plots, not much but it spread to almost all of us.

John Yeoman
October 2nd, 2010, 06:09 AM
I had blight for the first time ever. :( It was also 2nd wettest spring summer on record. Does anyone know if you can compost the plants that have suffered from blight?

Very risky, I think, unless you can guarantee the compost will heat up and remain at around 135oF for a long while. When blight started in my garden one year, it spread in a precise vector from one corner. I looked in the corner and - lo! - there was a volunteer tomato that had apparently grown from a blighted fruit I'd dropped there the previous year. Seemingly, it had started the plague all over again.

We're always advised to burn blighted potato leaves. :cool:

JanR
October 2nd, 2010, 09:05 AM
I guess I will have to throw the plants away or burn them. Unfortunately, I think I have already put some of the blighted tomatoes in the compost. I didn't realize what it was at first.:(

Maybe I will use my weed burner on the compost and the soil where the tomatoes were. Do you think it would help?