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Woodchuck
June 18th, 2007, 08:31 AM
Can anyone recommend a heirloom/open-pollinated cabbage variety that's good for long-term storage?


Thanx!!

justdoit
June 20th, 2007, 06:40 AM
Late Flat Dutch is the old standard keeper. I seem to remember that it was pulled roots and all... hung upside down in a root cellar. Other sources say to wrap in newspaper. If you have room to store with all the outer leaves left on, that should take care of preventing the loss of moisture. Also, it needs to be full size... heavy for it's size.

justdoit
June 20th, 2007, 07:14 AM
I accidently found this site while searching for a particular old Livingston tomato variety. I found the history/info that went with the different varieties very interesting. They have another late cabbage that sounds good. Hope this helps.


http://www.victoryseeds.com/catalog/vegetable/cabbage/cabbage.html

winter_unfazed
June 24th, 2007, 10:55 AM
There is not as much of a concern for long term storage of cabbage as some other things, because there are varieties of cabbage growing at all times of the year: for example, 'Copenhagen Market' for spring, 'Savoy for summer, 'Brunswick' for autumn, and 'January King' for winter.

justdoit
June 25th, 2007, 07:02 AM
WU, I don't bother with cabbage much anymore since I gave up making sour kraut... it is reasonably priced and always available. As I get older I want to consentrate my efforts on things that are either expensive to buy or much better quality when home grown.

silverseeds
July 4th, 2009, 03:32 AM
My wifes family is straight from poland, she just buys the cheapest seeds she finds in a discount store for cabbage, but does save others, anyway she will leave them under her bush sometimes covered in a towel or something for weeks on end, right out in the weather. Her cabbage meals are always good, she thinks that how to "cure" it. she says the leaves wont work right in her recipes unless you do that. sorry i dont know more specifics, but I think maybe they all have good storage qualities, especially if you dont keep in outside under a bush.

older than dirt
July 5th, 2009, 12:45 AM
Ive been told that you can put cabbage under the edge of a hay stack ( you know the old round toped hay stacks)& it would keep most all winter. Guess the hay keeps it from freezing & laying on the ground works well for humidity (shrug ) dont know never tryed it .

tweed
July 5th, 2009, 12:15 PM
Ive been told that you can put cabbage under the edge of a hay stack ( you know the old round toped hay stacks)& it would keep most all winter. Guess the hay keeps it from freezing & laying on the ground works well for humidity (shrug ) dont know never tryed it .

You can indeed use hay.
Take 4 square bales and make a square.
Put down a layer of straw and then a layer of cabbage heads, then straw, then cabbage, etc.
When full put bales across the top to protect.
Same method can be used for potatoes, etc.

Steve

silverseeds
July 5th, 2009, 03:16 PM
my wife grandma thinks having it wrapped up in a towel, shoved down into a bush, with leaves on it does well, for those without straw, lol,
now that I think of it she did say it will last most of the winter.

tweed
July 5th, 2009, 08:52 PM
my wife grandma thinks having it wrapped up in a towel, shoved down into a bush, with leaves on it does well, for those without straw, lol,
now that I think of it she did say it will last most of the winter.

Now THERE is an original/experienced idea.
Thanks to your grandma silverseeds. :)
The oldtimers are a wealth of knowledge.

Steve

Denninmi
July 6th, 2009, 10:39 AM
my wife grandma thinks having it wrapped up in a towel, shoved down into a bush, with leaves on it does well, for those without straw, lol,
now that I think of it she did say it will last most of the winter.

This approach would probably work very well in milder winter climates, such as the Carolinas/Georgia.

Here in the North, the best way to keep cabbage over the winter outdoors is to dig a pit about 24 to 30 inches deep (below the expected frost line -- the further north you are, the deeper it must be), fill it with dry leaves or stray, pack the cabbage in layers with more straw or leaves, and fill to the top with more insulating material. Then, cover the whole thing with a board and MORE insulation, the deeper the better.

Then, when there are breaks in the cold and snow, you can periodically dig out cabbages.

This works with MANY storage crops -- root crops, even stems of brussels sprouts trimmed of the leaves.

mjc
July 6th, 2009, 10:56 AM
And here in WV...make kraut.

WV has no 'normal' winter...it sits at the meeting of three climate zones so we get all sorts of weird weather. So shosrt of having a dedicated root cellar or some sort of regulated (refrigeration) cold storage, the best bet is not trying to keep fresh veggies long term. We've tried them...the pits, years we dug them, ended up being 'wet' and they filled with water and turned everything to compost tea. So we'd switch to ways for warmer/wetter areas and the weather would turn Arctic and turn everything into popsicles...until it melted, then it would become...compost tea. The best luck is kraut or keeping them in an extra refrigerator.

silverseeds
July 6th, 2009, 11:54 AM
This approach would probably work very well in milder winter climates, such as the Carolinas/Georgia.

Here in the North, the best way to keep cabbage over the winter outdoors is to dig a pit about 24 to 30 inches deep (below the expected frost line -- the further north you are, the deeper it must be), fill it with dry leaves or stray, pack the cabbage in layers with more straw or leaves, and fill to the top with more insulating material. Then, cover the whole thing with a board and MORE insulation, the deeper the better.

Then, when there are breaks in the cold and snow, you can periodically dig out cabbages.

This works with MANY storage crops -- root crops, even stems of brussels sprouts trimmed of the leaves.

I must have missed part of her explanation then, she speask polish, I dont always understand her well. she is in Nj nw but she did the same thing back in poland which is pretty cold, so my guess is I didnt totally understand her then......
unless she just doesnt need to be as picky in nj as poland, not sure

Emerald
July 6th, 2009, 05:44 PM
My Aunt and Uncle just pulled the whole plant trimmed the roots and just a few of the big outer leaves and then stood the whole plant, long tap root down in big buckets of sand in the root cellar. I think that the sand was damp as the sand in the carrot/potato/beet/parsnips was damp. When they went to use one, they might have had to cut quite a few of the outer leaves off and the root (which were fed to the animals that they had at the time, mostly pigs or chickens) and then just cooked it up. I have heard of cabbages also being being stored in the basement of the barn by pulling the whole plant and then doing just a touch of trimming and then they were hung up on hooks in the part of the barn basement that didn't freeze, but our family didn't do it that way.
__ I have made sauerkraut here and it is so much better than any you can buy in the store- and I love it when it is only about 1/2 way sour and way crunchy and still a bit salty- I just get a bowl full and eat it in front of the TV- I have always like sour and salty snacks for TV watching before the sweet stuff (not that I don't like my sweet stuffs!:D)