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kberry
May 7th, 2011, 11:08 PM
I live in zone 5 (southeast Nebraska).
I planted Rosemary in a pot on the patio last year and loved it.
This year I bought a larger plant and asked about over wintering.
I am told that it even though it's a zone 5 plant it does not over winter well in Nebraska.
So how can it be a zone 5 plant?
I was even told I can't even keep it going in the house over the winter because it won't live.

Anyone know about this?

Thank you.

GennyL
May 7th, 2011, 11:18 PM
I'm in NY & maybe if it were planted against the house it'd survive. I've always brought mine into the back hall ( some indirect light ) and water barely enough to keep alive. Found out the hard way to always start with 12-18 inch plants too.

kberry
May 7th, 2011, 11:28 PM
You guys get weather sometimes worse than we do!
Last winter was the pits for you guys!
So am I understanding you...you keep your plant in pot then?

I could do that and probably keep it in my living room for the winter.
I could keep it in the basement and its cooler down there but it would not get the indirect sunlight.

The plant I bought is about 8 inches and is a small bush.

What I grew last year never got that far.

Thank you for your help.

Tom C
May 8th, 2011, 12:47 AM
Rosemary trains reasonably well as bonsai. Repot and replace soil annually. Cool room with ample supplimental light. Out of doors after last average frost (in your area) return to cold room to over winter before first frost.

It'll take some cold (nights) but not much.

HerbalBetty
May 8th, 2011, 06:20 AM
What variety of rosemary did you get that is zone 5? Most rosemarys are zone 7, some are zone 6. A general guideline for plants in pots is the pots have to be at least 12 inches across and the plants in them have to be hardy a zone below what your zone is. So, for you, a plant hardy to zone 4 has the best chances of surviving winter outdoors in a pot that is at least 12 inches across. I lived in Nebraska for 7 years and now live in zone 5 in the northern Catskill Mountains of NY state. Very different, yet same zones!! We have much more snow cover (and therefor better insulation) than Nebraska. Good gardening to ya.

cottagequeen
May 8th, 2011, 08:23 AM
Yep, never heard of a zone 5 rosemary either! Only 2 that I know of that are hardy to zone 6, "Arp" and "Madeline Hill Hardy". Experimented with Arp in my zone 5b, but didn't make it thru the winter outside. I haven't given up yet tho! Wonder if maybe it was tagged wrong, as some of the other plants I got from this particular nursery were. Any how, one thing with rosemary is it doesn't tolerate windy winters outdoors, but likes a drafty place indoors.

woodwitch
May 8th, 2011, 08:43 AM
I have tried a couple of times to over winter Rosemary here in Kansas with no luck. I now dig my plants up and bring them inside. The two I brought inside last winter are doing great. All I did was put them in partial sun and treated them like a house plant. I found that I needed to water them twice a week or they started loosing leaves.

Liriodendron
May 9th, 2011, 08:52 PM
I've tried and tried with Rosemary over the years, but have never had luck overwintering in Zone 5, indoors or out. I just can't help but keep trying. Thanks for the suggestions everyone. One of these years, my rosemary will live see spring...

kberry
May 9th, 2011, 09:06 PM
I have Madeline Hill Hardy. The card that comes with the plant does have zone 5 on it.

Maybe I will try up next to the house with a space heater on it!!!
No just kidding. I guess all one can do is just keep trying.
Thanks for the help anyway.

cottagequeen
May 9th, 2011, 09:51 PM
I'll have to get Madeline Hill Hardy, as The Arp didn't make it here with my mini greenhouse over it.

cottagequeen
May 9th, 2011, 10:05 PM
from Mulberry Creek Herb farm where I got my Arp.
http://mulberrycreek.com/Detailed/138.html
Rosemary, Hill Hardy
Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis `Madalene Hill'
Life Cycle: Tender Perennial
Description/Size:
""Thanks for the Memories""

Madeleine Hill did not introduce this hardy variety (she introduced 'Arp'), rather it was named in her honor, by Tom DeBaggio. Long ago we were impressed with it's healthy and hardy growth habit. Not hardy in our open fields, but then all hardy rosemaries have a difficult time overwintering here. Plant against a south wall and protect from brisk winds with something transparent (not mulch!). A well drained, gravelly soil is also critical to prevent spring root rots.

Cold Tolerance: Zone 6b 7a 7b 8a 8b 9a 9b-11
Light: Full Sun to Full Sun
Height: 2-3 Feet
Water: Dry-Normal
Soil: Loamy-Sandy Well Drained
I am thinking the flooding of my bakyard may have been the reason for the demise of my rosemary. Will have to find a place on the south side of my house and try again this year. If that area floods then I am in BIG trouble! It hasn't in the 14 years I have lived here, back yard multiple times!

GennyL
May 9th, 2011, 10:11 PM
You guys get weather sometimes worse than we do!
Last winter was the pits for you guys!
So am I understanding you...you keep your plant in pot then?
I could do that and probably keep it in my living room for the winter.
I could keep it in the basement and its cooler down there but it would not get the indirect sunlight.

What I grew last year never got that far.

it stinks to plan around, up North gets big blast but we get this steady roll of snow all season.... I keep 1 or 2 and I've kept in the house just water more and mist directly 'cause it gets dry inside.
Snowball Award again yup-yup............

http://goldensnowball.blogspot.com/
It's a Wrap - Syracuse Wins the 2010 - 2011 Golden Snowball Award!

It's May 1st which means one thing, It's time to wrap up the 2010 - 2011 snow season here in CNY!!! It's official, Syracuse with another repeat victory wins the Golden Snowball trophy once again. What's that like 7 - 8 times in a row now. Whose counting huh? December really set the pace and there really was no looking back.

SherylGallant
May 10th, 2011, 07:01 PM
I want to overwinter my rosemary this year too. I have a lot of plants I have rooted from cuttings in the store and grown from seed this spring. Do you think it will survive if I let it go dormant in the fall and put the pots into cold cellar for the winter? Should I try overwintering on a sunny south windowsill in a cool, dry spare room or under a flourescent light in the kitchen? I suppose I could try them all and see what works the best.