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SophiesNana
August 28th, 2011, 12:43 PM
Have a beautiful Lantana in the yard that was left from former residents do I cut it back to the ground for fall? Thanks any input would be much appreciated

Blanesgarden
August 28th, 2011, 04:45 PM
You can, or just leave it. Next spring it will send up new growth. Doesnt really require anything, maybe some mulch-

SophiesNana
August 28th, 2011, 06:23 PM
Thank you so much for your info, I wasnt sure. Just really got into the gardening so its a learning project for me. Thanks. Have a great evening!:)

LuvsToPlant
August 29th, 2011, 04:43 AM
wOw...Lantana is hardy for you down there?
...I wish.

Yes Sophies...I would cut back.

jeffinsgf
August 29th, 2011, 05:49 AM
I've never had it survive even a light freeze.

LuvsToPlant
August 29th, 2011, 06:11 AM
I just checked the USDA zone for Lantana
says...zone 7 or 8 for cold hardiness
...guess we don't fit that Jeff...bummer.

Tutter
August 29th, 2011, 07:09 AM
We dig ours up every year, they don't always make it through a cold winter outside.

Texas Kenny
August 29th, 2011, 07:16 AM
According to Mrs Texas Kenny. Don't cut the winter kill lantana tops back until late spring cleanup. Cutting them to early allows water to enter stems and rot the crown over winter. North East TX

roper2008
August 29th, 2011, 07:36 AM
Miss Huff lantana is the only one that survives my winter.

SophiesNana
August 29th, 2011, 08:24 PM
Well to all of you thanks alot. Mine is very large and is beautiful, will try to post some pics. Of course I hope it survives the winter becuae I like it so much so I want to do whatever is necessary to keep it alive. Here in Ala the winters can get pretty cold sometimes or at least they did last year!:( Anyway just needed to know if I need to dig up, cut back to the ground or just leave it alone. Thank you all:)

Texas Kenny
August 30th, 2011, 08:01 AM
I would assume if it is quite large it has survived several past winters as ours have for many years. They do winter topkill but new growth comes again in the spring. A good mulching of leaves during the coldest months should be all the protection needed.
Butterflys love Lantana blooms.

stone
August 30th, 2011, 02:57 PM
What I've always heard about lantana is that when you cut it down in the Autumn, water fills those hollow stems and kills the plant during a freeze.

Here in zone 8 I've experimented with autumn pruning, spring pruning, never pruning, and really can't tell a difference.

What I have found is that throwing a layer of woodchips / manure / compost (whatever I have) on top of the limbs before frost, often results in additional plants in the spring... The limbs root, send up new growth, I dig and share.

ovenbird
August 30th, 2011, 03:52 PM
We have some specimens of lantana in the conservatory section of the
greenhouse and it has developed a woody trunk. I don't know how old it is, but it is about 5 feet tall.

Ezzrider
August 31st, 2011, 02:05 PM
I had Lantana that I though was dead after our "winter" where we had several days near 30 degrees. The plants turned completely brown and the limbs all looked dead to me. I cut some of these to the ground and some I just left alone. All of them came back in the spring. I really like the Lantana but I read they are bad for my goats?

VA Gardener
August 31st, 2011, 02:16 PM
My yellow lantana has never survived our winters.

LuvsToPlant
August 31st, 2011, 06:56 PM
I really like the Lantana but I read they are bad for my goats?
Lantana camara is the problem...yes it is toxic
It grows easily in the south...so be careful!
To humans and some domesticated farm animals such as goats.

Call a vet or someone that may know...I hear activated charcoal (like the kind at fish stores) can help reverse the problem.
But I don't know how...

Ezzrider
September 1st, 2011, 08:43 AM
Lantana camara is the problem...yes it is toxic
It grows easily in the south...so be careful!
To humans and some domesticated farm animals such as goats.

Call a vet or someone that may know...I hear activated charcoal (like the kind at fish stores) can help reverse the problem.
But I don't know how...

Thanks LuvsToPlant. Yep it is the Lantana camara in my yard. I only planted these in my front yard where the goats are not allowed to freely roam (I did not know at the time these were planted they poisonous to goats). Their pen is in the front yard though but I keep them in the pen unless they are going from the pen to the back yard (my property is fenced). In my back yard (where the lake is located) I have none and is where I let them out to play and forage. I do have to be careful though that when letting them go from back to front that they do not wonder over and start to eat the Lantana. I put the two older goats on a leash and the babies tend to follow most of the time but sometimes I find myself chasing them around the yard to get them into the pen. :) Anyone who has ever tried to catch a goat running free will tell ya it is almost impossible unless you get them into a corner!

SophiesNana
September 28th, 2011, 09:42 PM
I would assume if it is quite large it has survived several past winters as ours have for many years. They do winter topkill but new growth comes again in the spring. A good mulching of leaves during the coldest months should be all the protection needed.
Butterflys love Lantana blooms.

They sure do have had lots of them!!!!!!:D

not gort
September 29th, 2011, 10:29 AM
Miss Huff lantana is the only one that survives my winter.

Well that is good to know. I just bought one last week. :)

SpaceAge
October 2nd, 2011, 02:34 PM
Have a beautiful Lantana in the yard that was left from former residents do I cut it back to the ground for fall? Thanks any input would be much appreciated

loper cut it to the dirt ... heap a big pile of mulch over the crown ... next spring when all of the native stuff is coming alive , uncover the crown and water heavily with a fertilizer boost and they are off again ... :cool:

lmehaffey
October 2nd, 2011, 05:15 PM
It may depend on where it is planted. I have one next to the brick wall of our house (southern exposure) and it made it through last winter; it was cut back in late October, after the shoots had dired and hardened off, then mulched undwer about 4" of pine straw. It came back beautifully.