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ScarletO'Herring
March 3rd, 2008, 06:16 PM
Has anyone had any experience doing this? I have read a little on the 'net, but any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Scarlet

redbrick
March 3rd, 2008, 06:19 PM
Any advice I may have, I'm about to obtain in a few hours. I managed to save some seed balls from my Yukon Gold potatoes last year, and I'm going to try starting them like tomato seed this evening. Wish me luck!

LuvsToPlant
March 3rd, 2008, 06:23 PM
have had lots of luck...grew up on a potatoe farm (2nd largest in the state of Maine of exporters)
Whats you question?

ScarletO'Herring
March 3rd, 2008, 06:34 PM
have had lots of luck...grew up on a potatoe farm (2nd largest in the state of Maine of exporters)
Whats you question?

Well, most planting advice I've found goes toward planting seed tubers, so I guess my big question is - it any different with actual seed? How close? Do you still hill them? How deeply should they be covered? Do you need to start them inside? How long until they germinate? The very basic stuff, I've only ever grown potatoes from seed potatoes, never from seeds!

Scarlet

LuvsToPlant
March 3rd, 2008, 06:41 PM
They are not from a "seed" They are cut from a potato... the eyes are called seed.
Yes, you start them outside yes a hill, several inches apart.

LuvsToPlant
March 3rd, 2008, 06:47 PM
Plant potatoes 2-3 " deep several inches to a foot apart. Plants will emerge 2-3 weeks, the sooner in warmer weather. When the plants are about a foot tall then you "hill' them anbout 8" inches of soil around them.
This helps cover the potaoe so greening will not occur

It is not impossible to grow potato from the fruit and saved seeds
but they do not produce strong tubers compared to planting from the tubers "seed potato"

ScarletO'Herring
March 3rd, 2008, 07:11 PM
Yeah, and what I will have is the actual teeny-tiny seed, not seed potatoes. My littlest wanted to try growing them and I was hoping to get any advice so that I could maximize her success is all. As to seed potatoes, I never will forget the year my father brought home 50 pounds of seed potatoes, and spent night after night painstakingly cutting them apart for planting. I swear, we fed the whole county that year. I just figure that growing them from seeds has to be very different.

As I said, any advice as to how to grow them from actual seeds will be much appreciated.

Scarlet

randycarter
March 3rd, 2008, 09:15 PM
Sorry can't help you Scarlet. I use seed potatoes.

Eric
March 3rd, 2008, 11:00 PM
I'd suggest that you just fill in any gaps with knowledge with what you know about tomatoes. They are closely related. In fact the seed pods, despite its size, was vaguely similar to a tomato. It was green, had the inner cavities with the slime covered seeds. I saved the potato seeds the same way I did with tomatoes.
As for harvesting the seeds, I took a cue from nature, the pod would easily come off, or had already come off the plant and was on the ground. So they should germinate good, what you get is anyones guess. But I hope you let us know.

If you do start other stuff like tomatoes, I would try it with the potato seeds too. There are literally thousands so you can fail a lot. Also if you start them inside you'll get a jump in the season which may equate into useful potatoes, I figure you may end up with seed sizes ones otherwise (or in either case :) )

I direct seeded some bare earth last season, so I may get some that way, but time will tell.

I'm going to try this again this year, but I want to manage the varieties better, I have a couple potatoes and the seeds were from both in unknown percentages.

LuvsToPlant
March 4th, 2008, 04:56 AM
Do you already have the seeds? It is quite a process to get the seeds from the fruit. I can give you that info if you don't. Other than that, you plant the seeds about 3-4 weeks earlier than you would the seed potato.
Planting by seed is a method of growing used by potato breeders...
To plant potatoes to eat...you would be better off by seed potato.

LarryS
March 4th, 2008, 08:12 AM
Has anyone had any experience doing this? I have read a little on the 'net, but any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Scarlet

I have seen it done in a research lab setting, but have never known of a gardner to
attempt it. Potatoes, as you mention, can develop seed "pods", and under some conditions
they can be grown. If you try it, let us know how you come out.

ScarletO'Herring
March 4th, 2008, 09:24 AM
Do you already have the seeds? It is quite a process to get the seeds from the fruit. I can give you that info if you don't. Other than that, you plant the seeds about 3-4 weeks earlier than you would the seed potato.
Planting by seed is a method of growing used by potato breeders...
To plant potatoes to eat...you would be better off by seed potato.

I swapped for some seed on this forum, and they're on their way. My youngest (7) is my true farmer, she loves growing weird or unusual stuff and I usually let her (therefore we have rhubarb in the front lawn, beets in the flower planters, walking stick kale around the mailbox, tomatoes in every shape and color of the rainbow, and the most bizarre assortment of useless and totally ugly gourds you have ever seen lol - this year she wants to grow her own oatmeal!). She asked me to trade for this seed. I do have regular seed potatoes to plant for us to eat, so this was more of an experiment for her. I'm not sure she'll actually see anything she can eat. But she is thrilled nonetheless.

I think the seed has already been extracted (thanks Eric!). I guess we'll plant it in flats inside with the tomatoes, then set the seedlings out when it gets warmer.

Does anyone know of any links I can check out?

Does it require any special handling, like soaking or stratification? How well does it germinate, does anyone know? When she sets it out, does she handle it like a regular seed potato, set it in a trench and only lightly cover it, then hill them up with mulch and compost when they get taller? or do they need something else? Does she need to use sulfur like with regular potatoes? Also, I'm sure she'll want to know if she can save any tubers that grow this year to replant as seed potatoes next year. I guess this is all a much bigger experiment than I thought! :rolleyes:

Scarlet

TennOC
March 4th, 2008, 03:27 PM
A link to potato seed and other info...
http://www.benettontalk.com/opencms/opencms/benettontalk/en/min_0004/con_0002.html

ScarletO'Herring
March 5th, 2008, 07:45 AM
A link to potato seed and other info...
http://www.benettontalk.com/opencms/opencms/benettontalk/en/min_0004/con_0002.html

Thank you!!

Durgan
November 15th, 2009, 05:28 PM
The procedure is simple.

The seed pod was processed the same as saving tomato seeds. I planted the seeds about a month after processing and germination was almost 100% Three seeds to each of my four pots.

Start the seed in a pot as you would tomatoes. The plant grows nicely. When an appropriate size plant in a larger pot or cold frame. the plant will eventually produce small ground tubers. These are the tubers that one plants in the ground to produce the main season crop.

I have four pots of Russian blue growing now in the window sill. The plants are about three inches high, not large enough to place into a larger pot.

I have no idea how many small new tubers that will be produced, since this is my first effort at the procedure.

Apparently the potatoes produced from the main crop will be decidedly different from that produced from seed tubers. The best plants are selected for planting next year, and lo and behold a new type of tuber may be propagated.

NOTE; Planting using seed tubers insures an exact clone of the original.

LuvsToPlant
November 15th, 2009, 06:56 PM
Yes...the seed from the potato will not produce the same potato
grown from the parent plant.
In fact you will have many types of potatoes...each seed in a seed ball is different than the other.

JanR
November 15th, 2009, 09:09 PM
I saved some Yukon Gold seeds this year. Since I only grew Yukon Gold potatoes this year, what are the chances they they will produce different potatoes? I am sure that there in no one growing potatoes nearby. The closest person that gardens if probably at least a couple of miles away.

mjc
November 15th, 2009, 09:40 PM
I saved some Yukon Gold seeds this year. Since I only grew Yukon Gold potatoes this year, what are the chances they they will produce different potatoes? I am sure that there in no one growing potatoes nearby. The closest person that gardens if probably at least a couple of miles away.

Very high...potatoes are all essentially F1 crosses. They are bred from not quite pure lines to begin with and crossed with the hope of having the desired outcome...then the plant/plants matching those criteria are selected and grown out in the conventional manner (cutting up the tubers and planting those), a 'poor man's clone factory'. So basically, every crop of potatoes planted from seed is going to give a wide range of offspring...some matching closely to what you started with but most won't (and may not even resemble the parents of what you grew).

GunnarSK
May 26th, 2010, 03:21 PM
The procedure is simple.

The seed pod was processed the same as saving tomato seeds. I planted the seeds about a month after processing and germination was almost 100% Three seeds to each of my four pots.

I have four pots of Russian blue growing now in the window sill. The plants are about three inches high, not large enough to place into a larger pot.

I have no idea how many small new tubers that will be produced, since this is my first effort at the procedure.

Apparently the potatoes produced from the main crop will be decidedly different from that produced from seed tubers. The best plants are selected for planting next year, and lo and behold a new type of tuber may be propagated

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?NZBUS 22 August 2009 Processing Russian Blue Potato Seeds
Seeds have fermented somewhat, and they were rinsed with water , placed on a paper towel, and then on wax paper to dry. The main issue is to prevent clumping. The seeds will be allowed to thoroughly dry, then stored for growth in the future.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?VQCPT Summary: Saving Russian Blue Potato Seeds.
I have sowed some of the seeds (TPS), Durgan graciously sent last summer/fall, and they haven't been planted in the ground yet (but will be soon). The seedlings are distinctly diverse, some of them with purple stems, others with pink or green/white, and I assume that this covers different tuber colours as well as indicated by Tom Wagner at ***********.

GunnarSK
May 27th, 2010, 04:16 PM
They haven't been planted in the ground yet (but will be soon). The seedlings are distinctly diverse, some of them with purple stems, others with pink or green/white, and I assume that this covers different tuber colours as well as indicated by Tom Wagner at ***********.
Today eight seedlings from Durgan's "Russian Blue" TPS were planted (and I hope some of them are worthwhile) and one from Tom Wagner's crossed TPS. I still have some TPS from Durgan and a lot from Tom Wagner, and they will probably be sown next spring although it may still be possible to sow them now and get mini-tubers (for seed) this year.
Apparently "Russian Blue" is identical to some of the "varieties" that are popular here in Europe, particularly "(Blue) Congo".