PDA

View Full Version : What have you 'Put By' this spring?


RozieDozie
June 3rd, 2008, 01:17 PM
What have you ‘put by’ so far this spring? I have a wonderful old book called ‘Putting Things By’ that gives ways for preserving food.

So far this Spring I’ve ‘put by’:

Spinach
Asparagus
Strawberries
Blackberries
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Mustard greens
Collard greens
Turnip greens
Beets
Peaches (cling)
Green beans
Peas (snow and sugar snap)
Squash (lots of different kinds)

The summer gardens are going gangbusters now and the ‘putting by’ will speed up. 'Putting By' is just about my favorite part of gardening. :)

montanagarden
June 3rd, 2008, 01:22 PM
How are you putting by the greens?

I haven't had so much as a SPROUT yet this late spring but I do plan on putting a lot in the root cellar this fall.

springfever
June 3rd, 2008, 01:23 PM
Too early here, but looking forward to doing some blackberries, maybe beans if they do well, blueberries if they have any.

Stumpy
June 3rd, 2008, 01:31 PM
Wow! You've done so much.

I have a small raised bed garden and haven't had enough quantity of anything to put by, but I have picked more wild huckleberries than ever before. Oddly, the wild blackberry crop around our house is the worst ever and they're not nearly ready.

Emerald
June 3rd, 2008, 02:24 PM
So far this spring I've only gotten enuf spinach for eating and it is already starting to go to seed. But I am looking at all the huge blossoms on my three types of raspberries and Just counting the days till I can make jam and pie and my first try at fruit roll ups. the strawberries are not blooming well this year but are day-nuetrals so should set fruit all summer. All the rest of the crops are just babies and I will just have to wait for them to 'Put out" so I can "put by" lol:D

tuk50
June 3rd, 2008, 03:27 PM
So far we've put by ( good ole term ) 11 quart freezer bags of kale, collards and chard from winter garden. Got 3 winter squash left from fall garden and this years winter squash is about tennis ball size. Didn't have turnips or beets left over, but do have a lot of carrots that we are going to can in pint jars this afternoon. The tomatoes are just now turning, so will be busy next week canning tomatoes.:cool:

RozieDozie
June 3rd, 2008, 03:30 PM
So far this spring I've only gotten enuf spinach for eating and it is already starting to go to seed. But I am looking at all the huge blossoms on my three types of raspberries and Just counting the days till I can make jam and pie and my first try at fruit roll ups. the strawberries are not blooming well this year but are day-nuetrals so should set fruit all summer. All the rest of the crops are just babies and I will just have to wait for them to 'Put out" so I can "put by" lol:D

:D:D I live where it's warm; the spring garden is really the end of my winter garden.

Montana garden, I freeze the greens. We love spinach and all the rest but they bolts here as soon as the weather gets warm which was about 6 weeks ago.

Stumpy, I've never tasted a huckleberry that I know of; we have wild blackberries though, and a smaller berry called a dew berry. They are tiny and so, so good! I've tried transplanting them but they don't do well. They give lots of vine, few berries.

Springfever, our blueberries will come in soon. Hopefully there will be a good crop again this year. I still have a few frozen from last year but they're almost gone.

Gort
June 3rd, 2008, 04:10 PM
:D:D I live where it's warm; the spring garden is really the end of my winter garden.

Montana garden, I freeze the greens. We love spinach and all the rest but they bolts here as soon as the weather gets warm which was about 6 weeks ago.

Stumpy, I've never tasted a huckleberry that I know of; we have wild blackberries though, and a smaller berry called a dew berry. They are tiny and so, so good! I've tried transplanting them but they don't do well. They give lots of vine, few berries.

Springfever, our blueberries will come in soon. Hopefully there will be a good crop again this year. I still have a few frozen from last year but they're almost gone.

Do you blanch/parboil the collards, or just cut and freeze?

montanagarden
June 3rd, 2008, 04:11 PM
I'll have to freeze some, I've always just used them fresh and not thought about keeping any. This year I'm keeping all I can.


OH huckleberries are amazing... LOVE huckleberreis. I grew up fighting the bears for huge patches of huckleberries in the mountains...

Gort
June 3rd, 2008, 04:13 PM
PS: I had tried to grow collards..and had bugs destroy all that I grew.... the plants did not even get 1/2 foot tall(the leaves).
Grew Georgia Collards, iirc. Planted in late June(in zone 5...80's and humid)...buy by July, the beetles got 'em all.
Did I plant too early( our first frost is maybe Mid-Late October)?
Should I have waited until early August?
If I plant later..would the bugs(most likely) be gone by September/October(rest of garden, minus maybe peppers, is usually done for by Labor Day, or shortly afterwards).

RozieDozie
June 3rd, 2008, 04:55 PM
Do you blanch/parboil the collards, or just cut and freeze?

I blanch them, Gort, for about 3-4 minutes then plunge them into ice water. It shrinks them up some. I use both the big and little leaves. The more tender ones I just cut off the bottom stem; on the bigger ones, I strip the leaves off the stems because they are tuff. I chop the big ones, too, but you don't have to.

Gort, here, I plant collards in the fall, mid to late September. Any earlier than that and the bugs will get them. We maybe have 1 or two hard freezes a year (usually not until January)and the cold, i.e., frost, doesn't kill them, just makes them taste sweeter. We are in zone 8 so I'm not sure about your zone. But I do know that collards are cold hardy and they don't like hot weather.

Patio Princess
June 3rd, 2008, 08:19 PM
It's too early here to harvest anything that I can preserve (radishes, anyone?). I do plan to can a lot of green beans, tomato products, pickles, and pumpkin butter (I cheat, and start with store-bought pure pumpkin, in a can. I add spices and brown sugar. We use it in pancakes). Off-topic here a bit, as it's not food I grow, but I do can a nice ground beef mixture, which is mighty handy to make casseroles, soup, and lasagne with--especially when I come home from work--just open the jar, assemble the other ingredients, and bake. I highly recommend canning this, if you use a lot of burger/onion/green pepper/tomato in your recipes. It's in the Ball Blue book; you'll need a pressure canner; it CANNOT be canned using a hot water bath. Try to buy the burger on sale, to make it even nicer! It's so convenient to have on hand. Just remember, whatever you use it for, that you should beat it for at least 15 minutes in the recipe, for safety reasons (this is recommended with many canned foods).

I won't be making the variety I made last year. I was canning for the first time, and couldn't resist experimenting. I found that we're not eating a lot of the other stuff, so I'll make just what we use a lot.

RozieDozie
June 4th, 2008, 06:15 AM
It's too early here to harvest anything that I can preserve (radishes, anyone?). I do plan to can a lot of green beans, tomato products, pickles, and pumpkin butter (I cheat, and start with store-bought pure pumpkin, in a can. I add spices and brown sugar. We use it in pancakes). Off-topic here a bit, as it's not food I grow, but I do can a nice ground beef mixture, which is mighty handy to make casseroles, soup, and lasagne with--especially when I come home from work--just open the jar, assemble the other ingredients, and bake. I highly recommend canning this, if you use a lot of burger/onion/green pepper/tomato in your recipes. It's in the Ball Blue book; you'll need a pressure canner; it CANNOT be canned using a hot water bath. Try to buy the burger on sale, to make it even nicer! It's so convenient to have on hand. Just remember, whatever you use it for, that you should beat it for at least 15 minutes in the recipe, for safety reasons (this is recommended with many canned foods).

I won't be making the variety I made last year. I was canning for the first time, and couldn't resist experimenting. I found that we're not eating a lot of the other stuff, so I'll make just what we use a lot.

Pumpkin butter sounds yummy. If I made it, I'd have to use canned pumpkin, too, because, for some reason, I just can't seem to grow a pumpkin. :(

I have a new pressure canner. I like your idea of canning the ground beef. I think I'll try it.

HomesteadMommy
June 4th, 2008, 05:14 PM
[QUOTE=Patio Princess;120966]It's too early here to harvest anything that I can preserve (radishes, anyone?). I do plan to can a lot of green beans, tomato products, pickles, and pumpkin butter (I cheat, and start with store-bought pure pumpkin, in a can. I add spices and brown sugar. We use it in pancakes). QUOTE]

I can a lot of meat and soup to, it's so wonderful to have on hand! Like that I know what is really in it to.

Anyway I see that you can pumpkin butter. I really wanted to do canned pumpkin puree and/or pie filling last year. But I was told that Ball and the USDA doesn't recommend doing that anymore because it's to thick to heat through all the way in a home pressure canner. :confused: I was just wondering how it turned out for you?

I ended up peeling all our pumpkins and cubing them and canning it as cubes. It's ok, and only takes a second to mash up. But peeling them is a real pain!! I would love to know how many can pumpkin puree. It would be soooo much easier to bake or pressure cook them then peeling them all.

Patio Princess
June 4th, 2008, 05:23 PM
[QUOTE=Patio Princess;120966]It's too early here to harvest anything that I can preserve (radishes, anyone?). I do plan to can a lot of green beans, tomato products, pickles, and pumpkin butter (I cheat, and start with store-bought pure pumpkin, in a can. I add spices and brown sugar. We use it in pancakes). QUOTE]

I can a lot of meat and soup to, it's so wonderful to have on hand! Like that I know what is really in it to.

Anyway I see that you can pumpkin butter. I really wanted to do canned pumpkin puree and/or pie filling last year. But I was told that Ball and the USDA doesn't recommend doing that anymore because it's to thick to heat through all the way in a home pressure canner. :confused: I was just wondering how it turned out for you?

I ended up peeling all our pumpkins and cubing them and canning it as cubes. It's ok, and only takes a second to mash up. But peeling them is a real pain!! I would love to know how many can pumpkin puree. It would be soooo much easier to bake or pressure cook them then peeling them all.


I had no trouble with it, using the hot water bath method. Maybe, because it was already cooked and commercially canned, it's ok. Basically, I added spices, brown sugar, and I think a bit of lemon juice (which may help preserve it, plus the sugar). I wish I could remember where I got the recipe! It probably wasn't the Ball Blue book. I've made a few dozen pints of it, and use it regularly, and I'm still alive, so I guess it's safe! :)

I just buy the big cans of Libby's 100% pure pumpkin pie filling (not the kind with spices). I did once experiment with my canned version as pumpkin pie tarts; I may have added some evaporated milk. It turned out well. We normally use it in pancakes--very good.

Lanna
June 4th, 2008, 08:45 PM
I haven't put anything by yet. Still waiting for things to ripen. At least the mild/rainy weather's been good for the stuff we've actually had a chance to put in the ground before it starts with the torrential rain again. *sigh*

RozieDozie
June 5th, 2008, 06:29 AM
I ended up peeling all our pumpkins and cubing them and canning it as cubes. It's ok, and only takes a second to mash up. But peeling them is a real pain!! I would love to know how many can pumpkin puree. It would be soooo much easier to bake or pressure cook them then peeling them all.

HomesteadMommy, I'm wondering if you could partially bake the pumpkins in their skin until almost tender, let them cool, and then cube them? Would that make it easier for you? Seems like you could slide a knife between the pumpkin flesh and the skin and sort of lift it off?

Lanna, hope your rain clears up soon. Last year we were in a weird weather pattern and it rained all summer long. My 'maters rotted and mildewed on the vine. No one in these parts had any tomatoes. :(

Lanna
June 5th, 2008, 12:10 PM
Lanna, hope your rain clears up soon. Last year we were in a weird weather pattern and it rained all summer long. My 'maters rotted and mildewed on the vine. No one in these parts had any tomatoes. :(
Oh, I'm sure we'll have a month or so of summer at some point here... it's just that winter lasted until April this year. Which rarely happens, even on the 10-year crazy winter cycle we've got. Heck, a ski area 45 minutes from us was open for Memorial Day skiing. I don't *ever* remember that happening when I was growing up. Ever.

HomesteadMommy
June 5th, 2008, 06:10 PM
HomesteadMommy, I'm wondering if you could partially bake the pumpkins in their skin until almost tender, let them cool, and then cube them? Would that make it easier for you? Seems like you could slide a knife between the pumpkin flesh and the skin and sort of lift it off?
(

Hmmm that just might work! I'll give it a try this fall. I know it would make dh very happy not to have to peel them all for me. :p

reavilh
June 6th, 2008, 09:25 AM
We've been putting by a bunch of poke greens and spinich. but everything else is just starting to bloom. With all the rain, we didn't get everything out until late.

pepperhead212
June 6th, 2008, 06:22 PM
Because of the weather here changing form a cool May to a hot June, with the next 4 days in the mid to upper 90s, supposedly, (would be nice if they were wrong, like they often are when we DON'T want them to be! lol), many of my greens are showing signs of bolting, so I will have to harvest much of them this weekend. I have a large amount of komatsuna, or mustard spinach (mild for a mustard green), as well as bok choy, and a bunch of kohlrabi, from which I can also take the leaves when harvesting.

I was thinking of maybe trying to preserve some of this, along the lines of kimchee, or a Chinese type preserved vegetable. Has anybody done this before? I have made kimchee, but only with the mild napa cabbage - not sure how it would work out with these kind.

I have been eating so much of these greens that I hadn't eaten any meat since the day before Memorial day, until I ate some at lunch today - and that was at work! I am just about greened out! Fortunately, tomatoes aren't far behind...along with just a few other things!

Train
June 6th, 2008, 07:20 PM
Huh?
Put by? I can't get enough for a bite yet.
Ain't puttin nothin by.
Train

reavilh
June 8th, 2008, 11:40 AM
Well, I just went and picked about two quarts of cherries off our lone cherry tree. Poor thing was planted by my Dad about 30 years ago, and won't last much longer. I getting them ready to freeze.

FarmerCathy
June 8th, 2008, 06:57 PM
I put some garlic by. :D It's hanging under my parents house.

I'm hoping to put a whole bunch of tomatoes by, but its not looking so good. Bad potting soil mix. I do have a lot of swiss chard I need to do something with. It says I can dry it so I might try that.

TastyofHasty
June 8th, 2008, 10:07 PM
I have a few big (wintersown) Tyfon Greens plants growing on the side of the garden. They are apparently a relative of Komatsuna! Googled Tyfon Greens and found this:
http://www.ames.com/saladgreens.html

Komatsuna

• Also called:Mustard spinach.

• When to harvest: Begin thinning when leaves reach 3 to 4 inches long, and continue for salads until plants are half mature, or about 9 inches high. Cook larger plants. Mature size is 18 inches tall by 20 inches wide.

• Flavor: Very slightly peppery and delicious.

• Preparation and cooking: Use young leaves in salads. Cook mature leaves like spinach or mustard. The clusters of large, succulent leaves-individual leaves reach a foot long and 6 inches across-look something like chard.

Of the handful of komatsunas available, some are crosses of komatsuna with heading brassicas, either napa types or bok choy. Two hybrids in this category are 'Tyfon' and 'Tendergreen'.

Haven't put anything "by" yet, but stashed about 7 artichokes in the fridge; does that count? And two extra kohlrabi; and we ate five medium-size ones, sliced and cooked, tonight.

TastyofHasty
June 9th, 2008, 11:32 AM
Regarding kohlrabi, I found a pretty simple recipe in The Victory Garden Cookbook by Marian Morash; you finely chop 2 carrots, 2 stalks of celery, one onion, fry in butter, allowing all steam to escape; peel and slice 5 kohlrabi roots, add to the pan with more butter (used just under a half cup of butter in the whole thing!) Cover and every few minutes open to allow as much steam as possible to escape. Add salt and pepper as desired. After 45 minutes, and a lot of excess moisture being steamed out of all veggies, you have a lovely dish of kohlrabi. It tastes quite cabbage-y, in fact, the removal of moisture by steam is quite a lot like what I have to do when cooking cabbage.

FarmerCathy
July 7th, 2008, 05:15 PM
Canned Plum jam and froze some shredded zucchini seperated into two c. for zucchini bread. Will make some bread today with the 2c. I left out. Yum!

gardencrazy
July 7th, 2008, 05:22 PM
So far I've just frozen some broccoli and peas pods. Still waiting, waiting, waiting.

Dramaqueen
July 7th, 2008, 05:23 PM
Nothing, I dont expect to have any to put by. I am eating what I grow as it is not so much as I had expected, maybe IF my okra comes and my sweet potatoes and pumpkins and peppers I may have somethign to put by, but fo rnow, it is eat as I pick
________
Avandia settlement update (http://www.classactionsettlements.org/lawsuit/avandia/)

bugman37
July 7th, 2008, 10:24 PM
train,
How in the heck do you not have anything in Houston???? You're at least 2 zones warmer than me. I have "put by" 20 ears of corn tonight. Probably 15lbs of squash. Canned 6 cans of beans. Froze some zucchini bread. Ate plenty of lettuce and carrots. Tomatoes are about to go crazy. Have a few cantaloupes about to be ready. It's July and harvest time has begun!!!!

Lanna
July 8th, 2008, 12:52 AM
Only thing I've been able to put up this year so far is strawberry jam. Freezer strawberry jam, I'm not dealing with canning jam this year. I figure since I just grew a whole 'nother human, I'm allowed at least that little bit of laziness. ;)

I have strawberry lemonade concentrate (to can) and another batch of jam (freezer), but can't find lemons at Costco and ran out of pectin. *sigh*

At least I can see my tomato plants from the patio door now - they're green and getting bigger so they don't blend in with the dirt so much anymore. Now it's just a waiting game to see what starts ripening next... raspberries I'd guess, maybe cherries.

TastyofHasty
July 8th, 2008, 09:26 AM
Dried chocolate mint and peppermint, dried dill.

Lanna, unripe apples are great for mixing with other fruit 'cause they have very high pectin content ... ya don't have to BUY pectin if you use 'em. Seems like you mentioned having apple tree(s)? just my 2-cents stuck in there ... :o
I figure since I just grew a whole 'nother human,
oh yeah, and congratulations!

bluelacedredhead
July 8th, 2008, 09:45 AM
train,
How in the heck do you not have anything in Houston????


Off Season for Bananas in Houston??:p:rolleyes::D

RozieDozie
July 8th, 2008, 10:11 AM
Beautiful plum jam, FarmerCathy! Yum!

TastyofHasty, I have lots of chocolate mint. I never thought of drying it, though, but I imagine it would make a great tea.

I'm enjoying hearing about what you have and haven't put by. This is our busy season and there is a good harvest this year. We've come up with a new, firey hot dill pickle we named "Li'l Dynamite". Too hot for me, but Hubs and everyone else loves them. Seems like people are liking hot and spicy things more and more. We made bread and butter jalapenos and they went over well.

My next thing is going to be old fashioned relish. I have some recipes from my grandmother for pear, green tomato, and squash relish. Of course, she left out quantities. She wrote down things like: take a handful of sugar...

NightMist
July 8th, 2008, 12:22 PM
With weather related disasters and a late start I haven't done a lot yet.
Couple of dozen jars of strawberry goodness, preserves and jam mostly.
The raspberries are just now coming on to ripe so they will be next into the pantry.
The tutti fruitti is started. All that is in it at the moment are some strawberries, gooseberries and red and black currents as they come ripe (my ribes are too young to bear enough to do anything with them singly yet), and the scant amount of blueberries we got before the birds did down at the museum park.

I will be freezing greens soon. We are still in the midst of our early "WaHoo! Fresh greens!" revel.

As an experiment I have put up a half a dozen pints of shallots in butter. After we find out how they are, I will gift a jar to my mushroom growing friends and plant a bug in their ear about combining shallots and butter with assorted shroom varieties. Maybe see if I can get a swap beyond the annual red pasta sauce canning jubilee we share in going.

bluelacedredhead
July 8th, 2008, 02:01 PM
My next thing is going to be old fashioned relish. I have some recipes from my grandmother for pear, green tomato, and squash relish. Of course, she left out quantities. She wrote down things like: take a handful of sugar...

Rozie,

A Handful of sugar is a lot easier to work with than the recipe I have from my Great Grandma that says ".20c worth of..." She's been gone for more than 60 years, and I've spent the past 30 wondering how to convert the recipe, LOL

Locavore
July 8th, 2008, 04:07 PM
Gort, here, I plant collards in the fall, mid to late September. Any earlier than that and the bugs will get them. We maybe have 1 or two hard freezes a year (usually not until January)and the cold, i.e., frost, doesn't kill them, just makes them taste sweeter. We are in zone 8 so I'm not sure about your zone. But I do know that collards are cold hardy and they don't like hot weather.

Ah ha! You're who I need to talk to! I've been trying to figure out fall/winter planting dates here in zone 8a, given that we have such a late frost. When do you plant things like peas, cabbage, kholorabi, and other cool weather crops? Around September generally?

I've just made some more planting space (sadly, three squash plants bit the dust way too early, so I have some roon), and I'm wondering if I should try to sneak in another crop of beans, or wait until later and put in fall stuff. Thoughts? Suggestions?

Thanks!
M

Locavore
July 8th, 2008, 04:12 PM
And now, on to the actual topic of the thread: putting by.

Like other folks, for the most part I'm not getting enough right now to put by, but I'm working on some winter hold-overs, and can occasionally stash something from our CSA farm box. Not much. So far:

--About 50 heads of garlic
--5 batches of pesto (CSA basil, garden garlic)
--3 servings chicken broth
--Lots of coriander seeds (they're finishing up drying now, so I don't know how much I'll get exactly, but it will be a lot)
--One, lonely bag of green beans
--As an experiment, I dried about a dozen tomatos

I'm determined to learn how to can this year, so I'm hopeful I'll get to do some more interesting items like jam and pasta sauce.

Lanna
July 8th, 2008, 05:27 PM
Lanna, unripe apples are great for mixing with other fruit 'cause they have very high pectin content ... ya don't have to BUY pectin if you use 'em. Seems like you mentioned having apple tree(s)? just my 2-cents stuck in there ... :o
Yeah, but how unripe? Our apples are *maybe* the diameter of a dime, some a nickel. Things are a bit behind. And thank you! :)

FiberFlinger
July 10th, 2008, 07:39 PM
Dried some herbs. Pickled black walnuts yesterday, zuchinni relish tomorrow.

Bunny

springfever
July 11th, 2008, 05:14 PM
Stopped at a roadside stand today and bought some things and the lady gave me some overripe peaches which is just what I use to make my peach honey. Got it on the stove right now!

FiberFlinger
July 12th, 2008, 10:29 AM
Started 3 gallons of vinegar today.

Bunny

TastyofHasty
July 12th, 2008, 10:38 AM
Bunny, how do you make your vinegar??

reavilh
July 12th, 2008, 12:09 PM
I could have used some of that vinegar last nite. We put up 6 qts of pickled green beans. MMMMMMMMMM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

springfever
July 12th, 2008, 11:25 PM
2 bottles of blackberry syrup and 3 little jars of blackberry jelly.